A Grandfather’s Gift – An Applied-tip Powder Horn with Color Fraktur Scrimshaw (Horn #49)

This traditional right hand powder horn was a gift from a grandfather to his four year old grandson.   He wanted a powder horn with my color fraktur scrimshaw that had his grandson’s name.   I kept the powder horn simple with a relatively plain domed cherry base plug with a finial and turned Axis deer antler tip.   The decoration was also intentionally minimal consisting of the name on the top of the powder horn where it is easily viewed with fraktur flowers and a heart wrapping around the rest of the horn.

The powder horn is 14″ around the outside curve and 11 1/4″ tip to tip not including the walnut stopper.   The base plug is 2 1/4″ in diameter.

 

 

Horn #49 - An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of the owners name, flowers, and a heart - Outside
Horn #49 – An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of the owners name, flowers, and a heart – Outside
Horn #49 - An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of the owners name, flowers, and a heart - Bottom
Horn #49 – An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of the owners name, flowers, and a heart – Bottom
the owners name, flowers, and a heart - Inside
the owners name, flowers, and a heart – Inside
the owners name, flowers, and a heart - Inside
the owners name, flowers, and a heart – Inside
the owners name, flowers, and a heart - Top
the owners name, flowers, and a heart – Top

The bespoke price for a simple applied-tip powder horn is $215.   Scrimshaw adds $200 and color adds another $100.   The availability of any particular style, size or carry side of powder horn depends on my stock of raw horns.  If you would like something like this powder horn,  use the Contact page to get in touch with me, and we can discuss making you a similar horn.

Shipping/insurance a  horn of this value is $25 .   VA residents will have to pay an additional 5.3%  to 7% sales tax depending on their locality.

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point to ward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

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