Gun #19 Augusta/Rockbridge Virginia Rifle

This is a 1785 Augusta/Rockbridge County, Virginia style longrifle based on the earlier of the two rifles documented by Wallace Gusler in the Journal of Historical Arms Making Technology, Volume II (JHAT II). The patchbox and its engraving is an original design extrapolated from the box on the early gun documented in JHAT II as well as those by John Davidson. The dogwood flower is more contemporary, but I thought it appropriate as this is to be my personal rifle. The lock is a Chambers Early Ketland, filed, polished and engraved in a manner typical of most imported English locks with heat blued screws. The 54 caliber, 44″ long, Dickert profile Rice barrel is polished amory bright.

A White Lightning liner is installed. The rifle has modified Davis double set triggers that have been heat blued. The butt piece and guard are neatly filed from yellow brass castings from Reeves Goehring. The rest of the mounts, including the one piece nose piece, are hand made from sheet brass. The stock is carved from a blank of very curly, stump cut, quartersawn, hard maple from Freddie Harrison. The barrel is hand inlet using gouges, period gunstock planes, and rasps. The stock is entirely scraped and burnished and the rifle is generally finished in a workman like manner.

Details of forearm moulding.
Details of forearm moulding.

The forearm moulding was cut with a custom made scratch stock in the original manner and show the characteristic ripple from scraping very curly wood. Period correct tools and techniques were used with files, rasps, chisels, and planes being used for most of the work. The stock is stained with aqua fortis and finished in oil. I have fitted the scraped hickory ramrod with a plain sheet steel ferrule on the breech end that accepts a hand turned wiper made for the rifle with is stored in the patchbox.

If you are interested in the templates and layout guide I used to create this rifle, they may downloaded on this page.

The length of pull is approximately 13.5″ to the front trigger. The drop is a little more than 3″ and the cast off is about .25″.

The technical details:

Stock:Very curly, stump cut, quartersawn, Sugar Maple
Lock:Chambers Early Ketland
Barrel:Rice Dickert, 44″, C-54 caliber with Chambers White Lightning liner
Trigger:Davis double set triggers
Mounts:Reeves Goehring sand cast yellow brass butt piece and guard, all other mounts made from brass sheet

Photography – Shot Pouch

Shown here are photos of a contemporary Early Virginia shot pouch. Photographs of objects delivered/shipped (must include return shipping) to me cost $19 per finished image. A package of 5-6 images for a small object such as this pouch is $49. Full resolution digital images in .JPG or .TIFF format are delivered via download from the cloud. There is no physical product for convenience as well as tax issues. All images shown here are Copyright 2018 to Mark E. Elliott and may not be copied or reproduced in any manner without permission.

Photography – Products

Shown here are some non-muzzleloading product photos. Composed photos like the one of photography equipment would be a negotiated price based on the complexity of the required image. Single objects would be the standard $19 per image plus any surcharges for options like focus stacking. All images Copyright 2013 Mark E. Elliott and may not be copied or otherwise reproduced without permission.

Photography – Contemporary Longrifle

Shown here are a complete set of photos of a very nice contemporary flintlock longrifle based on an original rifle from Augusta/Rockbridge County Virginia. A package of 12+ images for a long gun such as this longrifle starts at $99. Full resolution digital images in .JPG or .TIFF format are delivered via download from the cloud. There is no physical product for convenience as well as tax issues. All images shown here are Copyright 2018 to Mark E. Elliott and may not be copied or reproduced in any manner without permission.

All images shown here are Copyright 2018 to Mark E. Elliott and may not be copied or reproduced in any manner without permission.

Photography – Flintlock Pistol

Shown here are photos of a very nice silver mounted antique flintlock pistol by Elisha Bull of east Tennessee. Photographs of objects delivered/shipped (must include return shipping) to me cost $19 per finished image. A package of 5-6 images for a small object such as this pistol is $49. The three-quarter image shown here was shot using focus stacking. Focus stacking is a technique that brings all parts of the object into sharp focus when the depth of the object in the image would be greater than the optical depth of field. That carries a additional charge of $12 per finished image. Backgrounds may be masked out and/or replaced in Photoshop (.PSD file provided) for $15 per image. Full resolution digital images in .JPG or .TIFF format are delivered via download from the cloud. There is no physical product for convenience as well as tax issues. All images shown here are Copyright 2013 to Mark E. Elliott and may not be copied or reproduced in any manner without permission.

All images shown here are Copyright 2013 to Mark E. Elliott and may not be copied or reproduced in any manner without permission.

Photography – Queen Anne Pistol

Shown here are photos of a very nice screw barrel Queen Anne pistol of contemporary manufacture by Steve Lodding. Photographs of objects delivered/shipped (must include return shipping) to me cost $19 per finished image. A package of 5-6 images for a small object is $49. Most of the images shown here were shot using focus stacking. Focus stacking is a technique that brings all parts of the object into sharp focus when the depth of the object in the image would be greater than the optical depth of field. That carries a additional charge of $12 per finished image. Backgrounds may be masked out and/or replaced in Photoshop (.PSD file provided) for $15 per image. Full resolution digital images in .JPG or .TIFF format are delivered via download from the cloud. There is no physical product for convenience as well as tax issues. All images shown here are Copyright 2012 to Mark E. Elliott and may not be copied or reproduced in any manner without permission.

All images shown here are Copyright 2012 to Mark E. Elliott and may not be copied or reproduced in any manner without permission.

Photography – Swords

Shown here are photos of a couple of antique swords. Photographs of objects delivered/shipped (must include return shipping) to me cost $19 per finished image or a package of 5-6 images of a small object for $49. The three-quarter shot(s) were done using focus stacking. Focus stacking is a technique that brings all parts of the object into sharp focus when the depth of the object in the image would be greater than the optical depth of field. That carries a additional charge of $12 per finished image. Backgrounds may be masked out and/or replaced in Photoshop (.PSD file provided) for $15 per image. Full resolution digital images in .JPG or .TIFF format are delivered via download from the cloud. There is no physical product for convenience as well as tax issues. All images shown here are Copyright 2013 to Mark E. Elliott and may not be copied or reproduced in any manner without permission.

All images shown here are Copyright 2013 to Mark E. Elliott and may not be copied or reproduced in any manner without permission.

A New Shot Pouch, Powder Horn & Patch Knife

I recently decided that I have too many historically correct shooting outfits for guns I have yet to build that I never use. Consequently, I resolved to sell those outfits and make an entirely new shooting outfit for myself making the shot pouch, powder horn and patch knife that interests me and not necessarily a cohesive historically correct outfit . I am starting with an embroidered diary case type shot pouch with a little different flap design than on my previous pouch of this type. If you will recall, this pouch is based on one shown on pages 34-37 of Jim Webb’s book on shot pouches and powder horns of Southern Appalachia.

I made a few changes.  I only put one extra layer of leather in the flap instead of the three of the original and only created one front pocket instead of the original two.   This reduced the number of layers of leather I had to sew through to a max of five.   I also used 2 oz veg tan cow hide instead of buckskin.   I used 6 oz veg tan cow hide for the strap.

It took a while to work out the pattern, but the shot pouch actually went together much easier than I expected. I cut out the leather very precisely making sure all the mating edges (and punched holes) lined up exactly. I punched all the holes for the embroidery and used my own design. Once the embroidery was done, I glued the pieces together along the edges using white glue. I think this was the key to being able to easily sew it all together; that and the precise matching of the holes.   In case you were wondering, the glue mostly dissolves away when the bag  was soaked in warm water to turn it.

The bag is stained with vinegar and iron. That was done right after the parts were cut out.  I like vinegar and iron because it is a traditional stain,  It stains through and doesn’t wash out.  I put a lot of Mink oil on the bag once it was all done and dried out.

I used linen thread for the embroidery; the same type thread I use to assemble the bag. You can get that thread in an unbelievable number of colors. I only used red, yellow, blue, and green as close as possible to the historic fraktur colors. All the stitching that shows is done with red thread. I used natural color thread for the stitches that don’t show.

By the way, the bag finished up a little under about 7″ x 7″.  The original was listed at 6 1/2″.

The little patch knife included with the pouch was made in a day. The blade was forged from 1075 spring steel. It was inserted in an Axis deer antler handle being held in place with a poured pewter bolster. A gray patina was added to the satin finish on the blade.

The powder horn I made for this project was dictated by the unfinished cow horn I chose. I picked a smallish horn that was thin walled throughout with a nice curve and a solid area of white on the base half of the horn. I had originally planned to add a base band, but felt it would be a shame to cover up any of the solid white horn that was available for scrimshaw. So I decided against any bands. The horn would have a simple fraktur engraving. I picked a nice white Axis deer antler piece for the tip to match the handle on the patch knife. You can see below the result. The base plug is cherry and hollowed out about 3/4 of it’s length. The stopper is black walnut. The horn is 12 3/4″ around the outside curve, not including the stopper. It is 11 1/4″ tip to tip. The base plug is about 2 5/16″ in diameter.

Two Fraktur Decorated Applied-tip Powder Horns

Small Fraktur Decorated Applied-Tip Powder Horn (#52)

Horn #52 - Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Top
Horn #52 – Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Top

Horn #52 - Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Bottom
Horn #52 – Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Bottom

This small fraktur engraved powder horn (#52) is a traditional left hand carry that can be carried either way.   It is approximately 13.5″ around the outside curve and 10″ tip to tip not including the stopper.   The Cherry base plug is 2.25″ in diameter.   The two piece applied-tip is made of horn and Axis deer antler.   The stopper is Black Walnut.   The horn was lightly stained with ferric nitrate and finished with Tried and True (linseed oil and beeswax).  The horn weighs a little over 6 oz.

The bespoke price for a horn like this would be $450.  Sales tax will be collected for Virginia residents and shipping would be between $20-$25.    If you would like a horn like this,  use the Contact page to let me know and mention Horn #52.

If you like this, perhaps you might be interested in some of my other fraktur such as my Birth/Baptismal/Marriage Certificates or paintings.

Horn #52 - Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Outside
Horn #52 – Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Outside

Horn #52 - Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Inside
Horn #52 – Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Inside

Medium Fraktur Decorated Banded Applied-tip Powder Horn (#53)

Horn #53 - Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Top
Horn #53 – Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Top

Horn #53 - Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Bottom
Horn #53 – Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Bottom

This larger banded fraktur engraved powder horn (#53)is also a traditional left hand carry that can be carried either way.   It is approximately 16″ around the outside curve and 12.75″ tip to tip not including the stopper.   The Cherry base plug is 2.6″ in diameter and hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.   The two piece applied-tip is made of horn and Axis deer antler.   The stopper is Black Walnut.   The horn was stained light yellow with ferric nitrate and finished with Tried and True (linseed oil and beeswax).  The horn weighs a little under 8 oz.

This horn is available for sale for the reduced price of $375 plus $25 shipping and insurance.  The bespoke price for a horn like this would be $475.  Sales tax will be collected for Virginia residents.  If you would like this horn,  use the Contact page to let me know and mention Horn #53.

If you like this, perhaps you might be interested in some of my other fraktur such as my Birth/Baptismal/Marriage Certificates or paintings.

Horn #53 - Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Outside
Horn #53 – Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Outside

Horn #53 - Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Inside
Horn #53 – Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Inside

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point to ward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

Horn Containers

Shown below are two small engraved horn containers that I made as Christmas gifts. This is the first time I have made this sort of horn container. I had to make a larger mandrel to turn the 3″ plus diameter horn sections. I learned after the fact that I could have straightened taller horn sections on the mandrel. These are less than a couple inches high. I will try some taller containers next time.

I also had to learn to turn facework as I did not have centerwork stock big enough for the Black Walnut tops and bottoms. The tops are hollowed out a bit to give a little more room inside.

I have engraved the horn sections with the initials of the recipients. This is also the first time I have done such large block lettering on a horn. I had to outline the letters and then tediously crosshatch within the outlines. All in all, this was quite the learning experience.

I am glad to say, the gifts seemed to be well received.

Small engraved horn containers with Walnut tops and bottoms.
Small engraved horn containers with Walnut tops and bottoms
Small engraved horn containers with the Walnut tops off.
Small engraved horn containers with the Walnut tops off.