Early Virginia Powder Horn with Color Scrimshaw

Shown here is a bespoke powder horn with color scrimshaw.   The form of the horn is Early Virginia with a turned  beaded hard maple base plug and a turned Axis deer antler tip.  This right hand  horn is approximately 14.75″ around the outside curve, 12.25″ tip to tip, and with a 2.375″ diameter base plug.    Per the clients specification, the horn is engraved with a male and a female Cardinal, dogwood flowers, tobacco leaves and a cornucopia.   A little color was added to the birds.  The horn and base plug is stained with ferric nitrate and the entire horn finished in Tried & True (linseed oil and beeswax).

This horn is not available, but I can make you something like it.   Just contact me with your ideas and we can discuss it. The bespoke price for a horn like this one with a turned base plug and turned applied tip is $215.   Engraving is generally an extra $200.  Added color is $100.   Shipping on a single horn generally runs $20-$25.    Appropriate sales tax will be collected  for Virginia residents.

Horn #57 - Early VA Powder Horn with Color Scrimshaw showing a male Cardinal and dogwood flowers.
Horn #57 – Early VA Powder Horn with Color Scrimshaw showing a male Cardinal and dogwood flowers.

Horn #57 - Early VA Powder Horn with Color Scrimshaw showing a female Cardinal and a cornucopia.
Horn #57 – Early VA Powder Horn with Color Scrimshaw showing a female Cardinal and a cornucopia.

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point to ward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

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Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch

I decided to try my hand at the embroidered diary case/shot pouch on pages 34-37 of Jim Webb’s book on shot pouches and powder horns of Southern Appalachia. This is my interpretation of that bag and I made it for myself.   I doubt anyone would pay me to make such a small and expensive bag.

I made a few changes.  I only put one extra layer of leather in the flap instead of the three of the original and only created one front pocket instead of the original two.   This reduced the number of layers of leather I had to sew through to a max of five.   I also used 2 oz veg tan cow hide instead of buckskin.   I used 6 oz veg tan cow hide for the strap.

It took a while to work out the pattern, but the shot pouch actually went together much easier than I expected. I cut out the leather very precisely making sure all the mating edges (and punched holes) lined up exactly. I punched all the holes for the embroidery and used my own design. Once the embroidery was done, I glued the pieces together along the edges using white glue. I think this was the key to being able to easily sew it all together; that and the precise matching of the holes.   In case you were wondering, the glue mostly dissolves away when the bag  was soaked in warm water to turn it.

The bag is stained with vinegar and iron. That was done right after the parts were cut out.  I like vinegar and iron because it is a traditional stain,  It stains through and doesn’t wash out.  I put a lot of Mink oil on the bag once it was all done and dried out.

By the way, the bag finished up a little under about 7″ x 7″.  The original was listed at 6 1/2″.

This bag is not for sale.  However, In the unlikely case you would want me to make you a little shot pouch like this one,  I would charge $550 for it plus $25 shipping and VA sales tax for VA residents.   You would get a different embroidery design on the flap for that money.

Pouch 48 - Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch - Full
Pouch 48 – Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch – Full
Pouch 48 - Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch - Flap
Pouch 48 – Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch – Flap
Pouch 48 - Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch - Inside
Pouch 48 – Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch – Inside
Pouch 48 - Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch - Back
Pouch 48 – Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch – Back

On someone’s recommendation,  I decided to add a little banded southern horn to this pouch.     It is a left hand horn that is fairly straight  and was intended from the beginning to be carried on the right side.  Actually all the horns on my personal outfits are left hand horns carried on the right.   I always thought that worked the best.   It was only later that I learned that historically, left had horns were carried on the left and right hand horns where carried on the right.

This horn (#56) is approximately 12″ around the outside curve, 10″ tip to tip (not including the stopper), with a base plug about 2.5″ in diameter.   The base plug is Cherry, the tip Axis deer antler, and the stopper Black Walnut.  The base plug is hollowed out about half it’s depth.

Pouch 48/ Horn 56 - Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch with a small southern banded powder horn.
Pouch 48/ Horn 56 – Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch with a small southern banded powder horn.
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Two Fraktur Decorated Applied-tip Powder Horns

Small Fraktur Decorated Applied-Tip Powder Horn (#52)

Horn #52 - Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Top
Horn #52 – Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Top
Horn #52 - Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Bottom
Horn #52 – Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Bottom

This small fraktur engraved powder horn (#52) is a traditional left hand carry that can be carried either way.   It is approximately 13.5″ around the outside curve and 10″ tip to tip not including the stopper.   The Cherry base plug is 2.25″ in diameter.   The two piece applied-tip is made of horn and Axis deer antler.   The stopper is Black Walnut.   The horn was lightly stained with ferric nitrate and finished with Tried and True (linseed oil and beeswax).  The horn weighs a little over 6 oz.

This horn is available for sale for $275 plus $25 shipping and insurance.  Sales tax will be collected for Virginia residents.    If you would like this horn,  use the Contact page to let me know and mention Horn #52.

Horn #52 - Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Outside
Horn #52 – Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Outside
Horn #52 - Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Inside
Horn #52 – Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Inside

Medium Fraktur Decorated Banded Applied-tip Powder Horn (#53)

Horn #53 - Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Top
Horn #53 – Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Top
Horn #53 - Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Bottom
Horn #53 – Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Bottom

This larger banded fraktur engraved powder horn (#53)is also a traditional left hand carry that can be carried either way.   It is approximately 16″ around the outside curve and 12.75″ tip to tip not including the stopper.   The Cherry base plug is 2.6″ in diameter and hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.   The two piece applied-tip is made of horn and Axis deer antler.   The stopper is Black Walnut.   The horn was stained light yellow with ferric nitrate and finished with Tried and True (linseed oil and beeswax).  The horn weighs a little under 8 oz.

This horn is available for sale for $275 plus $25 shipping and insurance.  Sales tax will be collected for Virginia residents.  If you would like this horn,  use the Contact page to let me know and mention Horn #53.

Horn #53 - Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Outside
Horn #53 – Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Outside
Horn #53 - Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Inside
Horn #53 – Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Inside

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point to ward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

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Southern Banded Powder Horns

Southern Banded Powder Horns

On this page I have some southern  multi-banded powder horns.   These types of horns are typically found in North Carolina and south.  The single banded horns are covered on the Virginia Applied Tip Powder Horns page.   All these horns have applied tips with most being screw-tips.   If you see something you like,  use the Contact page to get in touch with me, and we can discuss making you a similar horn.

Horn #54 - Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Top
Horn #54 – Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Top
Horn #54 - Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Bottom
Horn #54 – Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Bottom

This medium sized horn (Horn #54) is a traditional right hand carry horn.   It is approximately 14 3/8″ around the outside curve and 12 1/4″ tip to tip not including the Walnut stopper.  The curly Maple base plug is approximately 2 3/4″ in diameter and is hollowed out better than half its length.  The horn weighs a little over 8 oz due to the very dense base plug.  The horn and base plug are stained with ferric nitrate and normally aged.

Horn #54 - Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Outside
Horn #54 – Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Outside
Horn #54 - Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Inside
Horn #54 – Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Inside
Horn #51 - VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #51 – VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #51 - VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Bottom
Horn #51 – VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Bottom

This medium to large sized horn (Horn #51) is a traditional left hand carry inspired by some Early Virginia horns shown in Jay Hopkin’s book Bone Tipped & Banded Horns.  While it is a traditional left hand carry,  it can be carried on the right.  It is 16″ around the outside curve and 12 3/4″ tip to tip not including the stopper.   The Black Walnut base plug is 2.72″ in diameter and hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.   There is also a Black Walnut stopper in the horn screw-tip.  There is no stain on the horn.  It is all finished with Tried & True (linseed oil and beeswax).     This horn is thin and translucent its entire length.  It weighs a little under 8 oz.  This horn is currently for sale for $250.  Shipping/insurance on a single multi-banded horn is $25 .   VA residents will have to pay an additional 5.3%  to 7% sales tax depending on their locality.

Horn #51 - VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #51 – VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #51 - VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #51 – VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #50 - NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #50 – NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #50 - NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Bottom
Horn #50 – NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Bottom

This medium sized horn (Horn #50) is a traditional right hand carry inspired by the horns found in North Carolina.   It is about 14″ around the outside curve and about 11 1/4″ tip to tip.  The walnut base plug  is 2 1/4″ in diameter hollowed out about 3/4 of it’s length.  The applied-tip is Axis deer antler.   The stopper is walnut.

 

 

 

Horn #50 - NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #50 – NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #50 - NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #50 – NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #47 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #47 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #47 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Bottom
Horn #47 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Bottom

This little horn (Horn #47) is a traditional left hand horn, but can be carried either way.    It is about 12″ around the outside curve and 10″ tip to tip.   The walnut base plug is 2.03″ in diameter and hollowed out about 3/4 of it’s length.  The applied-tip is Axis deer antler.  The stopper is walnut.

 

 

Horn #47 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #47 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Outside

 

Horn #47 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #47 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Inside

 

Horn #42 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #42 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #42 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Bottom
Horn #42 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Bottom

The following horn (Horn #42) is historically a right hand carry, but can easily be carried either way.   It is about 14″ finial to tip, not including the stopper,  around the outside curve.   Tip to tip it is 11.5″.  The base plug is 2.41″ in diameter.   The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.  The Axis deer antler tip is pinned on.   The base plug and stopper are both Black Walnut.  There is a slight gap between the base band and the base plug, but it matches the grooves in the base plug.

 

Horn #42 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #42 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #42 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #42 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Inside

The horn below is a particularly small one.   It is pretty straight and could easily be, historically, either a right or a left hand carry;  about 11″ around the outside curve staple to stopper.   The base plug is a little less than 2 1/4″ in diameter.   It has a screw-tip with a female thread.  The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.

Horn #27 - A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.
Horn #27 – A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.
Horn #27 - A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.
Horn #27 – A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.

Horn #31 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - TopThe following horn (Horn #31) is historically a left hand carry, but is  setup as a right hand carry.   It can be carried either side without a problem.  It is about 13 1/2″ staple to stopper around the outside curve.   The base plug is a little less than 2 1/4″ in diameter.  It has a screw-tip with a female thread.  The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.

 

Horn #31 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Inside curve
Horn #31 – Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Inside curve
Horn #31 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Outside curve
Horn #31 – Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Outside curve

Horn #32 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - TopThe following horn (Horn #32) is historically  a left hand carry, but is marked assuming a right hand carry.  It can be carried on either side.    It is about 15″ button to stopper around the outside curve.   The base plug is a little more than 2 3/8″ in diameter.  It has a screw-tip with a female thread.  The base plug is hollowed out about 1/2 of its length.  There  is  a slight gap between the base ring and the base plug, but the horn is air tight.   This horn is also a little on the heavy side at  7.4 oz.   All that being said,  this is still a very nice looking little horn.

Horn #32 - Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Inside Curve
Horn #32 – Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Inside Curve
Horn #32 - Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Outside Curve
Horn #32 – Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Outside Curve
Horn #33 - Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn - Top
Horn #33 – Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn – Top

The following horn (Horn #33) is a big one inspired by some early Virginia horns in Jay Hopkin’s book.  I think it would work well with my early Virginia shot pouch.  It is historically  a right hand carry, but I think it would work better as a left hand carry.    It can be carried on either side.    It is about 17″ button to stopper around the outside curve.   The base plug is a little more than 2 5/8″ in diameter.  It has an applied tip made up from horn and antler.   The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.  This horn is actually very light weight for its size.  It weighs 6.8 oz.

Horn #33 - Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn - Inside
Horn #33 – Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn – Outside
Horn #33 - Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn - Outside
Horn #33 – Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn – Inside

All these multi-banded, applied tip horns are priced at $275 plus shipping for a bespoke horn.   Availability of any particular style, size or carry side of powder horn depends on my stock of raw horns.  If you see something you like,  use the Contact page to get in touch with me, and we can discuss making you a similar horn.

Shipping/insurance on a single multi-banded horn is $20 to $25  depending on destination withing the continental US.   VA residents will have to pay an additional 5.3%  to 7% sales tax depending on their locality.

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point to ward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

 

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A Grandfather’s Gift – An Applied-tip Powder Horn with Color Fraktur Scrimshaw (Horn #49)

This traditional right hand powder horn was a gift from a grandfather to his four year old grandson.   He wanted a powder horn with my color fraktur scrimshaw that had his grandson’s name.   I kept the powder horn simple with a relatively plain domed cherry base plug with a finial and turned Axis deer antler tip.   The decoration was also intentionally minimal consisting of the name on the top of the powder horn where it is easily viewed with fraktur flowers and a heart wrapping around the rest of the horn.

The powder horn is 14″ around the outside curve and 11 1/4″ tip to tip not including the walnut stopper.   The base plug is 2 1/4″ in diameter.

 

 

Horn #49 - An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of the owners name, flowers, and a heart - Outside
Horn #49 – An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of the owners name, flowers, and a heart – Outside
Horn #49 - An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of the owners name, flowers, and a heart - Bottom
Horn #49 – An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of the owners name, flowers, and a heart – Bottom
the owners name, flowers, and a heart - Inside
the owners name, flowers, and a heart – Inside
the owners name, flowers, and a heart - Inside
the owners name, flowers, and a heart – Inside
the owners name, flowers, and a heart - Top
the owners name, flowers, and a heart – Top

The bespoke price for a simple applied-tip powder horn is $215.   Scrimshaw adds $200 and color adds another $100.   The availability of any particular style, size or carry side of powder horn depends on my stock of raw horns.  If you would like something like this powder horn,  use the Contact page to get in touch with me, and we can discuss making you a similar horn.

Shipping/insurance a  horn of this value is $25 .   VA residents will have to pay an additional 5.3%  to 7% sales tax depending on their locality.

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point to ward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

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Late Flint Virginia Shot Pouch & Powder Horn

Late Flint VA Shot Pouch & Powder Horn
Pouch #16, Horn #14 – Late Flint VA Shot Pouch & VA Banded, Screw-tip Powder Horn

I made this shot pouch and powder horn for a Virginian headed south to the Texas fight for independence. It represents late flint pouch from the central Valley of Virginia, and is based on an example from Rockingham Co, VA as documented by Madison Grant in his book on hunting pouches. The horn is my standard Virginia, single banded, screw-tip powder horn.

 

This approximately 8″ x 8″ pouch is a three piece design of 3-4 oz vegetable tan cowhide consisting of a back, front, and flap. The back and flap are connected by a separate panel that is perforated at the top for the straps which are sewn inside. The pouch is not lined, as most original pouches were not, but it does include a small hanging pocket suitable for balls or other small items.  The bag is gusseted to increase the capacity; and all seams are welted which improves longevity. The flap and inside edge of the front panel are bound in goat or calf skin.  All my leather work is hand sewn with a saddle stitch using waxed linen thread.  The 6 oz  leather strap is 1″ wide and is adjusted with a plain forged iron buckle. There is also a leather keeper to keep the strap end neat. The pouch is stained with a vinegar and iron solution which results in a dark brown to blue/black color through the leather. This is a chemical stain; not a pigment. It will not wash out. The outside and part of the interior of the pouch is rubbed with Mink Oil and then brushed to protect the leather.

During the construction process, the leather and the finished pouch was distressed giving it a well broken in appearance. Almost all my work is slightly aged. Hopefully, those of you who are re-enactors will not be accused of being farb on my account.

Click and drag your mouse cursor horizontally across the image to spin the powder horn below. You can use you mouse wheel (scroll) to zoom in and out. You must zoom all the way out in order to spin the horn.
Shown below is a slightly larger version (approximately 9″x 9″) of the bag above made for a fowler paired with a plain southern powder horn.

Pouch 44/Horn 48 - Late Flint Virginia Shot Pouch with a Plain Southern Powder Horn.- Front
Pouch 44/Horn 48 – Late Flint Virginia Shot Pouch with a Plain Southern Powder Horn.- Front
Pouch 44/Horn 48 - Late Flint Virginia Shot Pouch with a Plain Southern Powder Horn.- Back
Pouch 44/Horn 48 – Late Flint Virginia Shot Pouch with a Plain Southern Powder Horn.- Back

You can obtain your very own pouch and horn outfit like the ones shown above for the following prices:

  • Late Flint Virginia Shot Pouch (as shown above) – $500 plus $25 shipping/insurance.
  • Powder Horn Hangers for Late Flint Virginia Shot Pouch – $15 (Option with a pouch order)
  • Add Decorative Tooling on the flap and front panel – $20 (Option with a pouch order)
  • A leather knife sheath added to the back or strap – $35 (Option with a pouch order – client must provide the knife)
  • Virginia Single Banded Screw-tip Powder Horn – $250 plus shipping
  • Plain Southern Horn – $150 plus shipping

Shipping on a single item is $15. Shipping on an outfit is $25. I will collect VA Sales Tax for items shipping to VA residents.

 

To order a pouch or horn like the ones shown above, or to discuss a different project, use the Contact form to send me an e-mail. See FAQ for more information on purchasing custom work.

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Applied-tip Powder Horn with Fraktur Scrimshaw (Horn #46)

I am doing scrimshaw horns right now and this one is more traditional fraktur with geometric designs and stylized flowers.   I skipped the color on this one except for the ferric nitrate stain giving a little yellow color to the horn.

This right hand horn is 14″ around the outside curve and 11.5″ tip to tip, not including the stopper. The cherry base plug is 2.48″ in diameter.  The tip is horn and antler. The stopper is walnut.   While this is a traditional right hand horn.  the engraved panels are positioned so that they look right when the horn is worn on either side.

The bespoke price for a horn with a turned base plug and an applied-tip  is $215.   Scrimshaw is $200.   VA residents will have to pay an additional 5.3%  to 7% sales tax depending on their locality.

 If you would like this horn,  use the Contact page to get in touch with me and mention horn #46.

 

Horn #46 - An applied-tip powder horn with traditional fraktur scrimshaw - Outside
Horn #46 – An applied-tip powder horn with traditional fraktur scrimshaw – Outside
Horn #46 - An applied-tip powder horn with traditional fraktur scrimshaw - Inside
Horn #46 – An applied-tip powder horn with traditional fraktur scrimshaw – Inside
Horn #46 - An applied-tip powder horn with traditional fraktur scrimshaw - Top
Horn #46 – An applied-tip powder horn with traditional fraktur scrimshaw – Top
Horn #46 - An applied-tip powder horn with traditional fraktur scrimshaw - Bottom
Horn #46 – An applied-tip powder horn with traditional fraktur scrimshaw – Bottom

 

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point to ward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

 

 

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Applied-tip Powder Horn with Color Fraktur (Horn #44)

I am doing more scrimshawed horns right now and trying some new things.  This is my latest effort featuring a Carolina parakeet and a Northern Cardinal along with some fraktur flowers.   I hope you like it.

This right hand horn is 14″ around the outside curve and 11.5″ tip to tip, not including the stopper. The cherry base plug is 2.29″ in diameter.  The tip is horn and antler. The stopper is walnut.   While this is a traditional right hand horn.  the engraved panels are positioned so that they look right when the horn is worn on either side.

The horn is colored with a little ferric nitrate prior to starting the engraving giving it a light yellow base. The ink is Windsor & Newton drawing ink. I finished up with some Tried and True oil on both the wood and horn followed by a coat of wax.

I am asking $300 for the horn plus $25 for shipping and insurance.   I collect the appropriate sales tax when shipped to a Virginia address.    The bespoke price for a horn with a turned base plug and an applied-tip  is $215.   Scrimshaw is $200.   The color is another $100.

Horn #44 - An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of a Carolina parakeet and a Northern Cardinal- Top
Horn #44 – An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of a Carolina parakeet and a Northern Cardinal- Top
Horn #44 - An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of a Carolina parakeet and a Northern Cardinal- Inside
Horn #44 – An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of a Carolina parakeet and a Northern Cardinal- Inside
Horn #44 - An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of a Carolina parakeet and a Northern Cardinal- Bottom
Horn #44 – An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of a Carolina parakeet and a Northern Cardinal- Bottom
Horn #44 - An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of a Carolina parakeet and a Northern Cardinal- Outside
Horn #44 – An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of a Carolina parakeet and a Northern Cardinal- Outside

 

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Acorn Finial, Applied-tip Powder Horn #41 with Color Fraktur

This Virginia inspired powder horn has an applied Axis deer antler tip and turned black walnut base plug and stopper.  The base plug has an acorn finial which was common on Virginia powder horns.  The horn is technically a left hand horn, but is so straight it could be easily carried either way.    It was engraved assuming right hand carry.  It is about 13.5″ around the outside curve (not including the stopper), 11.5″ finial to tip, and with a 2.12″ diameter base plug.   The horn has been stained with ferric nitrate to give it a slightly yellow base.   Fraktur type engraving has been applied to the horn and the engraved designs colored with drawing ink.

The bespoke price for for a horn like this is $215 for the base horn (turned base plug with  applied tip).   Similar scrimshaw would be $200.   Color added to the horn would be another $100.  Then there is $25 shipping/insurance and any applicable Virginia sales tax.

Horn #41 - Virginia inspired powder horn with color fraktur engraving - Outside
Horn #41 – Virginia inspired powder horn with color fraktur engraving – Outside
Horn #41 - Virginia inspired powder horn with color fraktur engraving - Inside
Horn #41 – Virginia inspired powder horn with color fraktur engraving – Inside

 

Horn #41 - Virginia inspired powder horn with color fraktur engraving - Top
Horn #41 – Virginia inspired powder horn with color fraktur engraving – Top
Horn #41 - Virginia inspired powder horn with color fraktur engraving - Bottom
Horn #41 – Virginia inspired powder horn with color fraktur engraving – Bottom
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Virginia Single Banded, Applied-tip Powder Horn #40

This is a Virginia inspired, banded, applied-tip powder horn.    It is a left hand horn that may be worn on either side.   The tip is Axis deer antler.   The base plug and stopper are black walnut.   The horn has been dyed with ferric nitrate and gently aged.    The horn is 13″ around the outside curve and 11″ tip to tip not including the stopper.    The base plug is  about 1 15/16″ in diameter.

A similar horn may be  ordered  for $235 plus $25 shipping/insurance and any applicable Virginia sales tax for Virginia residents.  Use the Contact page to send me an e-mail if you are interested in having a horn made like Horn #40.

Horn #40 - Virginia banded, applied-tip powder horn- Inside
Horn #40 – Virginia banded, applied-tip powder horn- Inside
Horn #40 - Virginia banded, applied-tip powder horn- Outside
Horn #40 – Virginia banded, applied-tip powder horn- Outside
Horn #40 - Virginia banded, applied-tip powder horn- Top
Horn #40 – Virginia banded, applied-tip powder horn- Top
Horn #40 - Virginia banded, applied-tip powder horn- Bottom
Horn #40 – Virginia banded, applied-tip powder horn- Bottom
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