Acorn Finial, Applied-tip Powder Horn (#41) with Color Fraktur

This Virginia inspired powder horn has an applied Axis deer antler tip and turned black walnut base plug and stopper.  The base plug has an acorn finial which was common on Virginia powder horns.  The horn is technically a left hand horn, but is so straight it could be easily carried either way.    It was engraved assuming right hand carry.  It is about 13.5″ around the outside curve (not including the stopper), 11.5″ finial to tip, and with a 2.12″ diameter base plug.   The horn has been stained with ferric nitrate to give it a slightly yellow base.   Fraktur type engraving has been applied to the horn and the engraved designs colored with drawing ink.

The bespoke price for for a horn like this is $175 for the base horn (turned base plug with  applied tip).   Similar scrimshaw would be $200.   Color added to the horn would be another $100.  Then there is $25 shipping/insurance and any applicable Virginia sales tax.

Horn #41 - Virginia inspired powder horn with color fraktur engraving - Outside
Horn #41 – Virginia inspired powder horn with color fraktur engraving – Outside
Horn #41 - Virginia inspired powder horn with color fraktur engraving - Inside
Horn #41 – Virginia inspired powder horn with color fraktur engraving – Inside

 

Horn #41 - Virginia inspired powder horn with color fraktur engraving - Top
Horn #41 – Virginia inspired powder horn with color fraktur engraving – Top
Horn #41 - Virginia inspired powder horn with color fraktur engraving - Bottom
Horn #41 – Virginia inspired powder horn with color fraktur engraving – Bottom
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Virginia Single Banded, Applied-tip Powder Horn #40

This is a Virginia inspired, banded, applied-tip powder horn.    It is a left hand horn that may be worn on either side.   The tip is Axis deer antler.   The base plug and stopper are black walnut.   The horn has been dyed with ferric nitrate and gently aged.    The horn is 13″ around the outside curve and 11″ tip to tip not including the stopper.    The base plug is  about 1 15/16″ in diameter.

This horn is currently sold pending funds.   A similar horn may be  ordered  for $190 plus $15 shipping/insurance and any applicable Virginia sales tax for Virginia residents.  Use the Contact page to send me an e-mail if you are interested in having a horn made like Horn #40.

Horn #40 - Virginia banded, applied-tip powder horn- Inside
Horn #40 – Virginia banded, applied-tip powder horn- Inside
Horn #40 - Virginia banded, applied-tip powder horn- Outside
Horn #40 – Virginia banded, applied-tip powder horn- Outside
Horn #40 - Virginia banded, applied-tip powder horn- Top
Horn #40 – Virginia banded, applied-tip powder horn- Top
Horn #40 - Virginia banded, applied-tip powder horn- Bottom
Horn #40 – Virginia banded, applied-tip powder horn- Bottom
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Virginia “Acorn” Powder Horn

This is a powder horn that I have had on my build list a while and finally got around to doing it.   It is a recreation of a horn shown on pages 334-335 of Jay Hopkin’s book Bone Tipped & Banded Horns.   That horn was found in Virginia and the acorn is a Virginia motif.

The horn shown below is a technically a right hand horn, but is so straight it could be easily carried either way.    It is about 12.5″ around the outside curve (not including the stopper), 10.25″ finial to tip, and with a 1.96″ diameter base plug.   The screw-tip is horn and has a female thread as is typical on southern horns.   The base plug and stopper are American Black Walnut.

I hadn’t initially intended to put color fraktur/engraving on the horn.   However, the buyer asked if I could add a little something.    So,  I did.   I hope he likes it.    I have included photos of the horn both before and after the engraving.

The bespoke price for a horn like #39 is $200 for the base horn plus $25 shipping/insurance and applicable Virginia sales tax when shipped to a Virginia address.   The engraving is another $200 with the color being an additional $100 on top of that.  If you are interested, please use the Contact page to send me a note.   Make sure to include the horn number (#39).

Horn #39 - Virginia "Acorn" screw-tip powder horn - Outside
Horn #39 – Virginia “Acorn” screw-tip powder horn – Outside
Horn #39 - Virginia "Acorn" screw-tip powder horn - Inside
Horn #39 – Virginia “Acorn” screw-tip powder horn – Inside
Horn #39 - Virginia "Acorn" screw-tip powder horn - End
Horn #39 – Virginia “Acorn” screw-tip powder horn – End
Horn #39 - Virginia "Acorn" screw-tip powder horn - Tip
Horn #39 – Virginia “Acorn” screw-tip powder horn – Tip
Horn #39 - Virginia "Acorn" powder horn with color fraktur engraving - Top
Horn #39 – Virginia “Acorn” powder horn with color fraktur engraving – Top
Horn #39 - Virginia "Acorn" powder horn with color fraktur engraving - Outside
Horn #39 – Virginia “Acorn” powder horn with color fraktur engraving – Outside
Horn #39 - Virginia "Acorn" powder horn with color fraktur engraving - Bottom
Horn #39 – Virginia “Acorn” powder horn with color fraktur engraving – Bottom
Horn #39 - Virginia "Acorn" powder horn with color fraktur engraving - Inside
Horn #39 – Virginia “Acorn” powder horn with color fraktur engraving – Inside
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Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch with Fraktur Embroidery Insert

The Face of God Fraktur

I decided that I wanted to combine my fraktur (18th & 19th Century German-American folk art) work with my leather work in some way.   Some sort of embroidery seemed the most sensible way to do it.   So, I decided to create an original fraktur design hand embroidered on a canvas insert in the flap of a Fur Trade era hunting pouch.   This hunting pouch (#36) is the result of that idea.   This is not a strictly historically correct pouch.   I have taken some creative license to pursue my artistic interests in fraktur.

The fraktur is titled the Face of God; representative of Jesus Christ (in the form of the peacock) as the human face of the trinity  (in the form of three tulips on each branch of the tree of life stemming from the heart of God) and the model for our lives.   It is stitched on natural cotton duck canvas using cotton embroidery floss.   About half the time to complete this pouch is in the  execution of the fraktur.  More pouches with different original hand embroidered fraktur are to follow.  That art work will be featured here.

The pouch itself is the best that I know how to make.   It is hand stitched using waxed linen thread out of 2-3 oz vegetable tan cowhide, fully lined with a period red print, and incorporating rolled welts, rolled bindings, and a flap lining of calfskin.   The pouch is 8 1/2″ x 9″ overall with a main storage area that is about 5″ x 8″.   There is an internal pocket for small items.  The strap passes through the top of the apron and is stitched inside the pouch for the cleanest possible appearance.  The strap can be adjusted via a brass buckle to a maximum of 57″ top of bag to top of bag.   I will make the strap accommodate any buyer.

As with all my leather work, the leather is stained with the period correct vinegar and iron for a blue-black to dark brown finish.   Mink oil is put on top of that.   I have not aged this pouch in any way.  The wrinkles in the leather are just from turning it.

This pouch is sold, but the bespoke price for a similar pouch is $850 plus $25 shipping/insurance and the applicable Virginia sales tax if shipped to a Virginia resident.

Bag #36 - Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch with embroidered fraktur insert.
Bag #36 – Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch with embroidered fraktur insert – The Face of God.
Bag #36 - Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch with embroidered fraktur insert - Front
Bag #36 – Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch with embroidered fraktur insert – The Face of God.- Front
Bag #36 - Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch with embroidered fraktur insert - Back
Bag #36 – Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch with embroidered fraktur insert – The Face of God.- Back
Bag #36 - Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch with embroidered fraktur insert - Inside
Bag #36 – Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch with embroidered fraktur insert – The Face of God.- Inside
Bag #36 - Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch with embroidered fraktur insert - Inside
Bag #36 – Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch with embroidered fraktur insert – The Face of God.- Inside

The God of Peace and Love

This pouch (#38) is identical to the one above (#36) in all ways except for the fraktur insert.   The insert is hand embroidered on natural cotton duck canvas using French made cotton embroidery floss.   The design is entitled “The God of Peace and Love.”

Pouch #38 is available for sale for $595 plus $25 shipping and any applicable Virginia sales tax.  

Photos of Pouch #38 are shown below.

Bag #38- Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch with embroidered fraktur insert – The God of Peace and Love – Front
Bag #38- Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch with embroidered fraktur insert – The God of Peace and Love – Back
Bag #38- Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch with embroidered fraktur insert – The God of Peace and Love – Front
Bag #38- Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch with embroidered fraktur insert – The God of Peace and Love – Inside
Bag #38- Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch with embroidered fraktur insert – The God of Peace and Love – Inside

A Pouch for My Brother

This hunting pouch (#40) was created just for my brother.   He wanted the first bag I created above (#36), but spoke up a little too late.  That bag went fast.  The followup fraktur embroidery that I did wasn’t all that appealing to him.  So,  I created this one.   It has a similar symbology to the first pouch with a single peacock, front and center,  representing Christ as the human face of God.  The three tulips represent the Trinity.  I have just included a photo of the flap.   The rest is pretty much the same as the bags above.

Bag #40- Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch with embroidered fraktur insert – Front
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Fraktur, Banded, Applied-tip Powder Horn (#37)

I have generally avoided scrimshaw because I have trouble controlling my hands.  However, I decided that I wanted to try again. I made this banded, applied-tip horn and added some fraktur scrimshaw. This is a traditional right hand carry horn with the horn itself from the right side of the cow. The horn has an antler tip and is a little less than 13.5″ around the outside curve not including the stopper. The base plug is a little less than 2.5″ in diameter. The base plug and stopper are walnut. I have just applied Tried and True to the wood and horn and have not aged the horn.

The fraktur features a peacock on the outside panel. The peacock represents Christ and is holding a tree of life with three tulips representing the trinity. There is another tree of life on the other side of the horn.

After finishing the scrimshaw and posting some photos, my colleages convinced me to color the fraktur scrimshaw.   So, I proceeded to add color to the horn.  I started by staining the horn with ferric nitrate giving me a parchment like base.   Then, I colored the fraktur as close to my watercolors as possible using Winston & Newton drawing inks.  I hope you like the result.

The bespoke price for for a horn like this is $190 for the base horn (turned base, applied-tip, and band).   Similar scrimshaw would be $200.   Color added to the horn would be another $100.  Then there is $25 shipping/insurance and any applicable Virginia sales tax.

Horn #37 – Banded, applied-tip, powder horn with fraktur – Outside
Horn #37 – Banded, applied-tip, powder horn with fraktur – Inside
Horn #37 – Banded, applied-tip, powder horn with fraktur – Top
Horn #37 – Banded, applied-tip, powder horn with fraktur – Bottom

 

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Early 18th Century Powder Horn

Shown here is my interpretation of a plain early 18th century horn.   It was made to go with my Mid 18th Century shot pouch.  This horn is based on the Gersham Biglow horn on page 13 of Powder Horns, Documents of History by Tom Grinslade.   That horn is dated to 1746.

This horn is 14 1/2″ around the outside curve not including the staple or stopper.   It is a little less that 3″ in diameter at the base.   There is a slightly domed walnut base plug that has been hollowed out about half it’s length.  The stopper is also walnut.

This is a traditional right hand horn intended to be carried on the right side.   That means that the horn is from the right side of the cow with the base pointing out and the spout pointing in when carried on the right side.

A horn like this would sell for $150 plus $15 shipping plus Virginia sales tax when shipped to a Virginia resident.

Horn #36 - An Early 18th Century Powsr Horn - Outside
Horn #36 – An Early 18th Century Powsr Horn – Outside
Horn #36 - An Early 18th Century Powsr Horn - Inside
Horn #36 – An Early 18th Century Powsr Horn – Inside
Horn #36 - An Early 18th Century Powsr Horn - Front to Back
Horn #36 – An Early 18th Century Powsr Horn – Base to Spout

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point to ward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

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Mid 18th Century Shot Pouch

Mid 18th Century shot pouch - Bag #34 - Front
Mid 18th Century shot pouch – Bag #34 – Front

Shown here is my version of a simple mid 18th Century shot pouch.   It is a variant of my Early VA shot pouch which is based on an original Virginia shot pouch that was documented by Wallace Gusler in the December 2009 Muzzle Blasts(pp. 4-8) as well as a French and Indian War shot pouch documented in the Clash of Empires exhibition catalog (p. 30).   This pouch is much more like the Clash of Empires pouch.

This pouch is a one piece bag, approximately 7″ x  7″,  with rounded bottom corners.   Essentially,  it is a “D” shaped pouch just like the Clash of Empires pouch.    There is a welt that acts as a center divider.   It is flat stitched up the sides.  This construction is common to both my Early Va pouch and the Clash of Empires pouch.

Mid 18th Century shot pouch - Bag #34 - Back
Mid 18th Century shot pouch – Bag #34 – Back

As there is no strap on the Clash of Empires pouch,  I used the same strap arrangement as on the Early VA pouch which was documented by Wallace Gusler from period sources.   That strap arrangement uses double buttons (think cuff links) to attach one side of the strap to the back of the pouch.  The other end of the strap is stitched to the back of the pouch.

This pouch, including the strap, is made from 3-4 oz vegetable tanned leather.  It is hand stitched with waxed linen thread and stained with vinegar and iron for a blue/black color.

Vinegar and iron is a period stain for leather and wood.   I like it because it is quick and easy to apply, doesn’t require a lot of stain, is permanent and doesn’t rinse out.   It works by reacting with the tannic acid in the leather.

This pouch has the flap tooled with a typical English pattern using an hand made star stamp.   Unfortunately,  this leather didn’t take tooling as well as I would have liked.  Some leather works better than others.

Mid 18th Century shot pouch - Bag #34 -  Flap
Mid 18th Century shot pouch – Bag #34 – Flap
Mid 18th Century shot pouch - Bag #34 - Open Flap
Mid 18th Century shot pouch – Bag #34 – Open Flap

If I can make a pouch like this for you,  use the Contact page to initiate an order.  The bespoke price for this pouch is $100.   The tooling is an extra $20.    The shipping on a single bag is $15.   Sales tax of at least 5.3% (higher in some areas) will be added to orders shipped to a Virginia address.

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Southern Banded Powder Horns

Southern Banded Powder Horns

On this page I have some southern  multi-banded powder horns.   These types of horns are typically found in North Carolina and south.  The single banded horns are covered on the Virginia Applied Tip Powder Horns page.   All these horns have applied tips with most being screw-tips.   If you see something you like,  use the Contact page to get in touch with me, and we can discuss making you a similar horn.

The horn below is a particularly small one.   It is pretty straight and could easily be, historically, either a right or a left hand carry;  about 11″ around the outside curve staple to stopper.   The base plug is a little less than 2 1/4″ in diameter.   It has a screw-tip with a female thread.  The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.

Horn #27 - A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.
Horn #27 – A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.
Horn #27 - A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.
Horn #27 – A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.

Horn #31 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - TopThe following horn (Horn #31) is historically a left hand carry, but is  setup as a right hand carry.   It can be carried either side without a problem.  It is about 13 1/2″ staple to stopper around the outside curve.   The base plug is a little less than 2 1/4″ in diameter.  It has a screw-tip with a female thread.  The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.

 

Horn #31 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Inside curve
Horn #31 – Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Inside curve
Horn #31 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Outside curve
Horn #31 – Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Outside curve

Horn #32 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - TopThe following horn (Horn #32) is historically  a left hand carry, but is marked assuming a right hand carry.  It can be carried on either side.    It is about 15″ button to stopper around the outside curve.   The base plug is a little more than 2 3/8″ in diameter.  It has a screw-tip with a female thread.  The base plug is hollowed out about 1/2 of its length.  There  is  a slight gap between the base ring and the base plug, but the horn is air tight.   This horn is also a little on the heavy side at  7.4 oz.   All that being said,  this is still a very nice looking little horn.

Horn #32 - Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Inside Curve
Horn #32 – Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Inside Curve
Horn #32 - Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Outside Curve
Horn #32 – Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Outside Curve
Horn #33 - Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn - Top
Horn #33 – Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn – Top

The following horn (Horn #33) is a big one inspired by some early Virginia horns in Jay Hopkin’s book.  I think it would work well with my early Virginia shot pouch.  It is historically  a right hand carry, but I think it would work better as a left hand carry.    It can be carried on either side.    It is about 17″ button to stopper around the outside curve.   The base plug is a little more than 2 5/8″ in diameter.  It has an applied tip made up from horn and antler.   The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.  This horn is actually very light weight for its size.  It weighs 6.8 oz.

Horn #33 - Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn - Inside
Horn #33 – Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn – Outside
Horn #33 - Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn - Outside
Horn #33 – Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn – Inside

All these multi-banded, applied tip horns are priced at $300 plus shipping for a bespoke horn.   Availability of any particular style, size or carry side of powder horn depends on my stock of raw horns.  If you see something you like,  use the Contact page to get in touch with me, and we can discuss making you a similar horn.

Shipping/insurance on a single multi-banded horn is $25 .   VA residents will have to pay an additional 5.3%  to 7% sales tax depending on their locality.

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point to ward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

 

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Fur Trade Era Shot or Hunting Pouches

Golden Age of Hunting Pouches

Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch - Pouch #29 - Full Front
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch – Pouch #29 – Full Front

For many years I have concentrated on 18th century shot pouches and simple mountain shot pouches.   These are generally small and of simple construction.   Some may have been made by harness makers but most were home made.    When we get to the 19th century,   the shot pouch or hunting pouch became a larger and more sophisticated affair more likely to have been professionally made.  The golden age of the hunting pouch coincides with the American Fur Trade era of about 1816 to 1850.

Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch - Pouch #29 - Full Back
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch – Pouch #29 – Full Back

This page features two similar Fur Trade Era hunting pouches with some sophisticated features.   Both  pouches feature a fringed welt and rolled bindings. The rolled bindings are along the edge of the flap and along the inside of the opening at the top of the front of the pouch.   The welts go where the front and back of the pouch attach to the gusset.    Both pouches have a  small internal pocket and a period printed fabric lining.   Additionally,  the straps pass through the apron at the top of the bag and attach to the inside of the pouch.

A Medium Single Hunting Pouch

This medium size single (one compartment)  pouch is about 8″ x 10″ overall, including the fringe.    The working part of the pouch is about 7″ x 7″.   The strap can usually be made up to at least 60″ and is adjusted with a brass buckle.    The flap has a little tooling on it.   I just couldn’t help but add a little decoration of a few diagonal lines.  I hope you agree that the whole bag has a very neat and professional appearance.

As are all my leather products, this pouch is hand stitched with waxed linen thread.    This bag is stitched at 8 stitches per inch.    I have used my standard vinegar and iron stain for a dark brown to black finish.   The bag is slightly aged and distressed.

Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch - Pouch #29 - Back
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch – Pouch #29 – Back
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch - Pouch #29 - Front
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch – Pouch #29 – Front

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch - Pouch #29
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch – Pouch #29
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch - Pouch #29 - Inside
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch – Pouch #29 – Inside
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch - Pouch #29 - Inside Pocket
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch – Pouch #29 – Inside Pocket

A Small Single Hunting Pouch

Pouch #30 - A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch - Front
Pouch #30 – A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch – Front

Shown here is a slightly smaller version of the bag above.  I actually like the shape a little better.

Pouch #30 - A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch - Back
Pouch #30 – A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch – Back

This small single (one compartment)  pouch is about 7.5″ x 8″ overall, including the fringe.    The working part of the pouch is roughly  6″ x 4.5″.   The main compartment is just a little bigger than my hand.  The strap is up to about 55″ top of bag to top of bag and is adjusted with a brass buckle.   The strap can be shortened, if necessary,  for the eventual owner.

As are all my leather products, this pouch is hand stitched with waxed linen thread.    This bag is stitched at 8 stitches per inch.    I have used my standard vinegar and iron stain for a dark brown to black finish.   The bag is slightly aged and distressed.

Pouch #30 - A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch
Pouch #30 – A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch
Pouch #30 - A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch - Inside
Pouch #30 – A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch – Inside
Pouch #30 - A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch - Inside Pocket
Pouch #30 – A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch – Inside Pocket

The pouch above is currently available for sale for $295 plus $20 shipping/insurance and 5.3% VA sales tax for VA destinations.   Use the Contact Form to let me know if you would like to purchase Pouch #30 or one like it.

Bespoke Pricing for Similar Fur Trade Pouches

  • Single Fur Trade Pouch (like #29 or #30)- $350 plus $20 shipping/insurance
  • Leather Powder Horn Hangers – $15 (Option with a pouch order)
  • Leather knife sheath attached to back of pouch – $35 (Option with a pouch order – client must provide knife)

Use the Contact Form to let me know if you would like to have a pouch made like #29 or #30.

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Southern Mountain Shot Pouches & Powder Horns

Southern Heart Shaped Shot Pouch

Heart shaped southern mountain shot pouch and powder horn
Bag #11, Horn #7 – Full Front
Heart shaped southern mountain shot pouch and powder horn
Bag #11, Horn #7 – Full Back

Most of the southern mountain shot pouches shown on this page were copied from Jim Webb’s book Sketches of Hunting Pouches, Powder Horns, and Accoutrements of Southern Appalachia. I made the first, heart shaped, shot pouches pictured here exactly as shown on pages 18-19; approximately 7.5″wide x 7.5″ high, using 3-4oz  vegetable tanned cowhide and linen thread.This shot pouch design consists of a one piece back and flap with a front panel attached via a 1″ gusset that goes around the entire pouch and attaches to the strap.  The strap can  generally be cut up to at least 60″ top of bag to top of bag.

Back of heart shaped southern mountain shot pouch
Bag #11, Horn #7 – Back

The shot pouch is assembled such that the flesh sides are stitched together without a welt, and the bag is not turned. This results in the gusset folding inward. It is an unusual arrangement, but that is how the original was constructed. I used an iron buckle on the strap to allow for seasonal adjustment. The leather was stained with vinegar and iron. The strap is about 60″ and can be shortened as much as necessary just by punching new holes for the buckle.

Southern mountain shot pouch and powder horn
Bag #11, Horn #7 – Front

The attached powder horn is based on several original powder horns from Southwest Virginia. It is about 13″ around the outside curve with a 2 1/2″ base plug. It is hand scraped and filed with a turned walnut base plug attached using hand forged nails. A turned walnut stopper finishes the horn. The horn is dyed yellow with aquafortis and appropriately aged.

Below is a heart shaped pouch with a slightly different horn.  This horn has an turned applied collar instead of integral rings, and is based on the horn on pages 228-229 in Jay Hopkins book Bone Tipped and Banded Horns.    It is about 12 1/2″ around the outside curve with a 2 1/4″ base plug.   

Bag #24, Horn #24 - A powder horn with a turned base plug and a applied turned collar - Front
Bag #24, Horn #24 – A powder horn with a turned base plug and a applied turned collar – Front
Bag #24, Horn #24 - A powder horn with a turned base plug and a applied turned collar - Back
Bag #24, Horn #24 – A powder horn with a turned base plug and a applied turned collar – Back

 

 

Below are two heart shaped shot pouches with plain powder horns  that are much more typical of what you would find in the southern mountains.  The bottom outfit uses linen cord and chain to attach all the accouterments, much as it would have in the period.

Pouch #27 and Horn #28 - A typical southern shot pouch and powder horn outfit.
Bag #27,  Horn #28 – A heart shaped shot pouch with a plain carved throat powder horn
Horn #3 - Bag #8 -  A plain southern powder horn attached by linen cord to a Southern heart shaped shot pouch.
Bag #8, Horn #3 – Another heart shaped shot pouch with a very plain powder horn

Typical One Piece Shot Pouch

Bag #25, Horn #29 - Typical Mountain Shot Pouch & Powder Horn
Bag #26, Horn #29 – Typical Mountain Shot Pouch

This is a very typical one piece rectangular shot pouch based on the one shown on pages 14-15 of Jim Webb’s book. It is just one piece of leather stitched up the sides with a welt and then turned inside out. I added the welt since the pouch was to be turned. The original did not have one. The pouch measures about 7″ wide by about 8″ high.  The strap can generally  be cut up to at least 60″ top of bag to top of bag.

The attached horn (#29) is very similar to Horn #24 shown above.    It has a turned base plug and an turned, applied collar.  It is about 13 1/2″ around the outside curve (button to stopper) with an approximately  2 1/8″ base plug.   

The pouch body and strap are made from 3-4 oz vegetable tanned cowhide.   An iron buckle is used for strap adjustment.   The leather is stained with vinegar and iron for a blue-black color and finished with mink oil and black shoe polish.  

Bag #25, Horn #29 - Typical Mountain Shot Pouch
Bag #26, Horn #29 – Typical Mountain Shot Pouch
Bag #25, Horn #29 - Typical Mountain Shot Pouch & Powder Horn
Bag #26, Horn #29 – Typical Mountain Shot Pouch

Small Two Piece Shot Pouch

Bag #25, Horn #27 - An outfit for a southern squirrel rifle
Bag #25, Horn #27 – An outfit for a southern squirrel rifle

This shot pouch is shown on pages 16-17 of Jim Webb’s book.  It is a very simple two piece (back with flap, and front)  pouch flat sewn along the bottom and up the sides  with a brass button holding the flap closed.  It is little under  7″ wide  x 6″ high.  The strap is a maximum of about 54″ top of bag to top of bag and can be shortened as necessary.  It is basically just large enough for your hand, and I would only expect to  carry a few balls, some patch material, and maybe a measure and a couple flints.      I imagine it being carried with a squirrel rifle and paired it with a very small banded screw-tip horn for just a few shots.   

The horn is about 10 1/2″ around the outside curve (staple to stopper) with a base plug about 2 1/8″ in diameter.  It is straight so it can be correct as either a left or right hand carry, and has been setup as a right hand carry.  I figure it might hold 10 shots worth of powder for a small caliber rifle.   

The pouch body and strap are made from 3-4 oz vegetable tanned cowhide.   An iron buckle is used for strap adjustment.   The strap can generally  be cut up to at least 60″ top of bag to top of bag.   The leather is stained with vinegar and iron for a blue-black color and finished with mink oil and black shoe polish.  

Bag #25, Horn #27 - An outfit for a southern squirrel rifle
Bag #25, Horn #27 – An outfit for a southern squirrel rifle
Bag #25, Horn #27 - An outfit for a southern squirrel rifle
Bag #25, Horn #27 – An outfit for a southern squirrel rifle

Pillow Ticking and Leather Pouch

Shown here is a very practical pouch made from pillow ticking and a bit of leather for the flap.   The bag is approximately 8″x 10″ and fully lined in that there are no raw edges showing on the inside.   A leather reinforcement has been placed on the inside of the bag and stitched to the flap.   The leather strap is stitched to the flap and internal reinforcement and is adjusted by an iron buckle.   The strap is a maximum of about 57″ top of bag to top of bag.    It can be shortened as necessary for the eventual owner.  

Pouch #31 - Pillow ticking and leather pouch - Front
Pouch #31 – Pillow ticking and leather pouch – Front
Pouch #31 - Pillow ticking and leather pouch - Back
Pouch #31 – Pillow ticking and leather pouch – Back

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pouch #31 - Pillow ticking and leather pouch - Front
Pouch #31 – Pillow ticking and leather pouch – Front
Pouch #31 - Pillow ticking and leather pouch - Inside
Pouch #31 – Pillow ticking and leather pouch – Inside

The pouch above is for sale for $95 plus $15 shipping and 5.3% VA Sales tax, if applicable.   Use the Contact Form to let me know if you would like to purchase Pouch #31  or one like it.

Bespoke Pricing for Shot Pouches & Powder Horns

Bespoke Pricing for items like the ones shown above is as follows:

  • Southern Heart Shaped Shot Pouch (like #11) – $125 plus shipping
  • Southern One Piece Shot Pouch (like #26) – $120 plus shipping
  • Small Two Piece Shot Pouch (like #25)- $115 plus shipping
  • Pillow Ticking and Leather Pouch (like #31) – $115 plus shipping
  • Leather Powder Horn Hangers – $15 (Option with a pouch order)
  • Leather knife sheath attached to back of pouch – $35 (Option with a pouch order – client must provide knife)
  • Plain Southern Powder Horn with a flat base plug (with staple)  and  a simple carved throat and spout (like #3 or #28) – $105 plus shipping
  • Southern Powder Horn with a Turned Base Plug, and a carved throat and spout with integral rings (like #7)  – $150 plus shipping
  • Southern Powder Horn with a Turned Base Plug and a  applied collar (#24 or #29) – $120 plus shipping.
  • Multiple Banded Screw-tip Powder Horn (like #27) – $215 plus shipping
  • Tin Powder Measure, Whipped Brush and Pick set (as shown with Bag #11) – $50

Priority shipping and insurance on a single item is $15. Shipping on an outfit is $20. I will collect VA Sales Tax for items shipping to VA residents.

If you would like something similar to what is shown on this page, or even something completely different, use the Contact form to send me an e-mail. See FAQ for more information on purchasing custom work.

The availability of any particular horn design depends on the availability of an appropriate unfinished horn in my inventory.

I try to make all my recreated shot pouches and horns look used. That means adding wrinkles, puckers, perhaps some cracks, and a bit of dirt and oil.  I leave normal blemishes in the leather that add some character.

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point toward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

 

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