Southern Banded Powder Horns

Southern Banded Powder Horns

On this page I have some southern  multi-banded powder horns.   These types of horns are typically found in North Carolina and south.  The single banded horns are covered on the Virginia Applied Tip Powder Horns page.   All these horns have applied tips with most being screw-tips.   If you see something you like,  use the Contact page to get in touch with me, and we can discuss making you a similar horn.

Horn #54 - Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Top
Horn #54 – Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Top
Horn #54 - Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Bottom
Horn #54 – Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Bottom

This medium sized horn (Horn #54) is a traditional right hand carry horn.   It is approximately 14 3/8″ around the outside curve and 12 1/4″ tip to tip not including the Walnut stopper.  The curly Maple base plug is approximately 2 3/4″ in diameter and is hollowed out better than half its length.  The horn weighs a little over 8 oz due to the very dense base plug.  The horn and base plug are stained with ferric nitrate and normally aged.

Horn #54 - Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Outside
Horn #54 – Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Outside
Horn #54 - Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Inside
Horn #54 – Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Inside
Horn #51 - VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #51 – VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #51 - VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Bottom
Horn #51 – VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Bottom

This medium to large sized horn (Horn #51) is a traditional left hand carry inspired by some Early Virginia horns shown in Jay Hopkin’s book Bone Tipped & Banded Horns.  While it is a traditional left hand carry,  it can be carried on the right.  It is 16″ around the outside curve and 12 3/4″ tip to tip not including the stopper.   The Black Walnut base plug is 2.72″ in diameter and hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.   There is also a Black Walnut stopper in the horn screw-tip.  There is no stain on the horn.  It is all finished with Tried & True (linseed oil and beeswax).     This horn is thin and translucent its entire length.  It weighs a little under 8 oz.

Horn #51 - VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #51 – VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #51 - VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #51 – VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #50 - NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #50 – NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #50 - NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Bottom
Horn #50 – NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Bottom

This medium sized horn (Horn #50) is a traditional right hand carry inspired by the horns found in North Carolina.   It is about 14″ around the outside curve and about 11 1/4″ tip to tip.  The walnut base plug  is 2 1/4″ in diameter hollowed out about 3/4 of it’s length.  The applied-tip is Axis deer antler.   The stopper is walnut.

Horn #50 - NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #50 – NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #50 - NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #50 – NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #47 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #47 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #47 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Bottom
Horn #47 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Bottom

This little horn (Horn #47) is a traditional left hand horn, but can be carried either way.    It is about 12″ around the outside curve and 10″ tip to tip.   The walnut base plug is 2.03″ in diameter and hollowed out about 3/4 of it’s length.  The applied-tip is Axis deer antler.  The stopper is walnut.

Horn #47 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #47 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #47 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #47 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #65 - Southern multi-banded powder horn - Top
Horn #65 – Southern multi-banded powder horn – Top
Horn #65 - Southern multi-banded powder horn - Bottom
Horn #65 – Southern multi-banded powder horn – Bottom

 The next horn (Horn #65) is a historically left hand horn carried on the right side so that it wraps around the body.    It is about 14 5/8″ finial to tip, not including the stopper,  around the outside curve.   Tip to tip it is 13″.  The base plug is about 2 5/8″ in diameter.   The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.  The Axis deer antler tip and horn collar are pegged on.   The base plug and stopper are both Black Walnut.

Horn #65 - Southern multi-banded powder horn - Outside
Horn #65 – Southern multi-banded powder horn – Outside
Horn #65 - Southern multi-banded powder horn - Inside
Horn #65 – Southern multi-banded powder horn – Inside

The horn (#27) below is a particularly small one.   It is pretty straight and could easily be, historically, either a right or a left hand carry;  about 11″ around the outside curve staple to stopper.   The base plug is a little less than 2 1/4″ in diameter.   It has a screw-tip with a female thread.  The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.

Horn #27 - A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.
Horn #27 – A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.
Horn #27 - A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.
Horn #27 – A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.

Horn #31 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - TopThe following horn (Horn #31) is historically a left hand carry, but is  setup as a right hand carry.   It can be carried either side without a problem.  It is about 13 1/2″ staple to stopper around the outside curve.   The base plug is a little less than 2 1/4″ in diameter.  It has a screw-tip with a female thread.  The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.

Horn #31 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Inside curve
Horn #31 – Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Inside curve
Horn #31 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Outside curve
Horn #31 – Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Outside curve

Horn #32 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - TopThe following horn (Horn #32) is historically  a left hand carry, but is marked assuming a right hand carry.  It can be carried on either side.    It is about 15″ button to stopper around the outside curve.   The base plug is a little more than 2 3/8″ in diameter.  It has a screw-tip with a female thread.  The base plug is hollowed out about 1/2 of its length.  There  is  a slight gap between the base ring and the base plug, but the horn is air tight.   This horn is also a little on the heavy side at  7.4 oz.   All that being said,  this is still a very nice looking little horn.

Horn #32 - Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Inside Curve
Horn #32 – Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Inside Curve
Horn #32 - Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Outside Curve
Horn #32 – Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Outside Curve
Horn #33 - Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn - Top
Horn #33 – Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn – Top

The following horn (Horn #33) is a big one inspired by some early Virginia horns in Jay Hopkin’s book.  I think it would work well with my early Virginia shot pouch.  It is historically  a right hand carry, but I think it would work better as a left hand carry.    It can be carried on either side.    It is about 17″ button to stopper around the outside curve.   The base plug is a little more than 2 5/8″ in diameter.  It has an applied tip made up from horn and antler.   The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.  This horn is actually very light weight for its size.  It weighs 6.8 oz.

Horn #33 - Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn - Inside
Horn #33 – Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn – Outside
Horn #33 - Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn - Outside
Horn #33 – Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn – Inside

All these multi-banded, applied tip horns are priced at $295 plus shipping for a bespoke horn.   Availability of any particular style, size or carry side of powder horn depends on my stock of raw horns.  If you see something you like,  use the Contact page to get in touch with me, and we can discuss making you a similar horn.

Shipping/insurance on a single multi-banded horn is $20 to $25  depending on destination withing the continental US.   VA residents will have to pay an additional 5.3%  to 7% sales tax depending on their locality.

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point to ward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

Late Flint Virginia Shot Pouch & Powder Horn

Late Flint VA Shot Pouch & Powder Horn
Pouch #16, Horn #14 – Late Flint VA Shot Pouch & VA Banded, Screw-tip Powder Horn

I made this shot pouch and powder horn for a Virginian headed south to the Texas fight for independence. It represents late flint pouch from the central Valley of Virginia, and is based on an example from Rockingham Co, VA as documented by Madison Grant in his book on hunting pouches. The horn is my standard Virginia, single banded, screw-tip powder horn.

This approximately 8″ x 8″ pouch is a three piece design of 3-4 oz vegetable tan cowhide consisting of a back, front, and flap. The back and flap are connected by a separate panel that is perforated at the top for the straps which are sewn inside. The pouch is not lined, as most original pouches were not, but it does include a small hanging pocket suitable for balls or other small items.  The bag is gusseted to increase the capacity; and all seams are welted which improves longevity. The flap and inside edge of the front panel are bound in goat or calf skin.  All my leather work is hand sewn with a saddle stitch using waxed linen thread.  The 6 oz  leather strap is 1″ wide and is adjusted with a plain forged iron buckle. There is also a leather keeper to keep the strap end neat. The pouch is stained with a vinegar and iron solution which results in a dark brown to blue/black color through the leather. This is a chemical stain; not a pigment. It will not wash out. The outside and part of the interior of the pouch is rubbed with Mink Oil and then brushed to protect the leather.

During the construction process, the leather and the finished pouch was distressed giving it a well broken in appearance. Almost all my work is slightly aged. Hopefully, those of you who are re-enactors will not be accused of being farb on my account.

Click and drag your mouse cursor horizontally across the image to spin the powder horn below. You can use you mouse wheel (scroll) to zoom in and out. You must zoom all the way out in order to spin the horn.
Shown below is a slightly larger version (approximately 9″x 9″) of the bag above made for a fowler paired with a plain southern powder horn.

Pouch 44/Horn 48 - Late Flint Virginia Shot Pouch with a Plain Southern Powder Horn.- Front
Pouch 44/Horn 48 – Late Flint Virginia Shot Pouch with a Plain Southern Powder Horn.- Front
Pouch 44/Horn 48 - Late Flint Virginia Shot Pouch with a Plain Southern Powder Horn.- Back
Pouch 44/Horn 48 – Late Flint Virginia Shot Pouch with a Plain Southern Powder Horn.- Back

You can obtain your very own pouch and horn outfit like the ones shown above for the following prices:

  • Late Flint Virginia Shot Pouch (as shown above) – $500 plus $25 shipping/insurance.
  • Powder Horn Hangers for Late Flint Virginia Shot Pouch – $30 (Option with a pouch order)
  • Add Decorative Tooling on the flap and front panel – $20 (Option with a pouch order)
  • A leather knife sheath added to the back or strap – $45 (Option with a pouch order – client must provide the knife)
  • Virginia Single Banded Screw-tip Powder Horn – $275plus shipping
  • Plain Southern Horn – $150 plus shipping

Shipping on a single item is $15. Shipping on an outfit is $25. I will collect VA Sales Tax for items shipping to VA residents.

To order a pouch or horn like the ones shown above, or to discuss a different project, use the Contact form to send me an e-mail. See FAQ for more information on purchasing custom work.

Contemporary Fraktur Documents

What is Fraktur?

Fraktur is the term for the illuminated documents created in the 18th & 19th centuries by German speaking immigrants to America. Fraktur is typically associated with Pennsylvania, but it can be found anywhere that large groups of German speaking peoples settled, including my home state of Virginia.  Fraktur actually refers to the “fractured” or printed black letter Gothic font that is used in the documents.  It is printed letter by letter as opposed to being written as continuous script.   Fraktur is a form of calligraphy and some people use the terms interchangeably.

If fraktur documents just consisted of printed text, probably few people would pay attention to them or collect them.   However, fraktur are very often, almost always, embellished with colorful decoration.   Fraktur documents are filled with all sorts of familiar flowers, folliage, and birds.   Some of the flowers and birds are easily recognizable, and some are just fanciful representations.    Most of these images are rendered in primary colors; red, yellow and blue or some easy combination of those.

Most of the original fraktur are Geburtschein (birth certificates),  Taufschein (baptismal certificates), family registers.   You also see Haus Segen (house blessings) consisting of scripture or poetry colorfully illustrated, and book plates.    I create all of these and also marriage certificates.   I am open to creating most any type of fraktur document.   I have seen fraktur posters, flyers, and family trees.

Contemporary Fraktur Documents

Stock Designs

Below are examples of a hand lettered and hand colored Geburtschein , Marriage Certificate, Family Register, Haus Segen, and Book Plate using stock designs.  These are my original contemporary designs, and are available printed on heavy weight, A4 size (except for book plates) paper.  Design 1 (used for the sample Geburtschein and Marriage Certificates below) is most appropriate for a Geburtschein, a Taufschein, or marriage certificate.   Design 2 (used for the Haus Segan) is most appropriate for a a short prayer or verse as in a Haus Segan.

I will inscribe your’s or your loved one’s birth or baptismal record, or marriage record on Design 1  for $89 postpaid.   A short prayer or verse can be inscribed on Design 2 also for $89.  The family register  can be inscribed with any single family’s information for $99 postpaid.  These documents are all   hand lettered and hand colored prints on A4 calligraphy paper of the original designs shown on this page .  The documents may be mounted on foam board and matted for a 11″ x 14″ frame for an extra $19.  Sales tax is collected for VA residents.

You need to understand that these are not prints of finished works. I simply print a line drawing of the original design  as a starting point. The paper may be aged or not; your choice. Then I re-ink the lines where I feel it is necessary,  layout and inscribe the fraktur text using dip pens and calligraphy ink, add additional art where appropriate, and then do the coloring with period correct water colors. The hand coloring and lettering will vary from one document to another. No two documents using the same design are going to be exactly alike.

Geburtschein (Birth Certificate), Taufschein (Baptismal certificate) or Marriage Certificate

Sample Geburtschein fraktur using Design 1
Hand lettered and hand colored sample Geburtschein fraktur using Design 1
Sample marriage certificate fraktur using Design 1
Hand lettered and hand colored sample marriage certificate fraktur using Design 1

Hand colored and hand lettered Geburtschein, Taufschein  or Marriage Certificate print using Design 1 – $89 postpaid

Please use this Contact Form if you are interested in contracting for a fraktur document. Make sure to include your phone number so that I can call you about the project.

Family register

Sample Family Register fraktur using Design 3

Hand colored and hand lettered Family Register print using Design 3 – $99 postpaid

Please use this Contact Form if you are interested in contracting for a fraktur document. Make sure to include your phone number so that I can call you about the project.

Haus Segen (House Blessing)

Hand lettered and hand colored Haus Segen using Design 2 in a Faux Painted Frame
Hand lettered and hand colored Haus Segen using Design 2 in a Faux Painted Frame

Hand colored and hand lettered Haus Segen print using Design 2 – $89 postpaid

Please use this Contact Form if you are interested in contracting for a fraktur document. Make sure to include your phone number so that I can call you about the project.

Vorschrift

A Vorschrift is a lettering example usually done by school masters for the use of their students. Below is my Vorschrift Design 2 I did for my own reference, but I will also do a hand lettered and hand colored copy for you. It is available for $65 each.

Vorschrift - School Master Lettering Sample 2
Vorschrift – School Master Lettering Sample (Vorschrift Design 2) in a Faux Painted Frame

Hand colored and hand lettered  Vorschrift Design 2- $99 postpaid

Please use this Contact Form if you are interested in contracting for a fraktur document. Make sure to include your phone number so that I can call you about the project.

Book Plate

Book plates were common among original fraktur as books were rare and valuable things.   So people wanted to make sure their name was on them.   I have developed a stock book plate design that I like.   I can inscribe it with your name and hand color it for $29 postpaid plus any applicable VA sales tax..   For that you will get the original hand lettered and hand colored bookplate mailed to you and an .pdf document e-mailed to you which will allow you to print eight of your book plates on a full sheet label.

Fraktur Book Plate Design 2
Fraktur Book Plate Design 2

Hand colored and hand lettered  Book Plate Design 2- $29 postpaid

Please use this Contact Form if you are interested in contracting for a fraktur document. Make sure to include your phone number so that I can call you about the project.

Exclusive Designs

In addition to the hand lettered and hand colored prints of previous designs; I can produce an original, exclusive design; hand drawn, hand inked, hand lettered, and hand colored in any type or style you like. I can create an all original Geburtschein (birth certificate), Taufschein (baptism  certificate), family register, Haus Segen (house blessing), Marriage Certificate, or a purely decorative work. Actually, I could create a fraktur style document to commemorate most any event.

Exclusive Design Fraktur - Marriage Certificate
Exclusive Design Fraktur – Marriage Certificate

A completely original small size document (A4 – 8.27″ X 11.7″, 60lb, hot press, Sennelier Ink & Calligraphy paper) costs $149 postpaid.  The document may be mounted on foam board and matted for a 11″ x 14″ frame for an extra $19.  Sales tax is collected for VA residents.  Use the Contact page to inquire about such custom work.   After some discussion,  I will then send you a contract with the details for you to sign and return with a check.  I usually provide a sketch of the fraktur design for approval prior to inking and coloring.

Please use this Contact Form if you are interested in contracting for a fraktur document. Make sure to include your phone number so that I can call you about the project.

If you like these fraktur documents, perhaps you will also like my fraktur illustrations.

Mid 18th Century Shot Pouch

Mid 18th Century shot pouch - Bag #34 - Front
Mid 18th Century shot pouch – Bag #34 – Front

Shown here is my version of a simple mid 18th Century shot pouch.   It is a variant of my Early VA shot pouch which is based on an original Virginia shot pouch that was documented by Wallace Gusler in the December 2009 Muzzle Blasts(pp. 4-8) as well as a French and Indian War shot pouch documented in the Clash of Empires exhibition catalog (p. 30).   This pouch is much more like the Clash of Empires pouch.

This pouch is a one piece bag, approximately 7″ x  7″,  with rounded bottom corners.   Essentially,  it is a “D” shaped pouch just like the Clash of Empires pouch.    There is a welt that acts as a center divider.   It is flat stitched up the sides.  This construction is common to both my Early Va pouch and the Clash of Empires pouch.

Mid 18th Century shot pouch - Bag #34 - Back
Mid 18th Century shot pouch – Bag #34 – Back

As there is no strap on the Clash of Empires pouch,  I used the same strap arrangement as on the Early VA pouch which was documented by Wallace Gusler from period sources.   That strap arrangement uses double buttons (think cuff links) to attach one side of the strap to the back of the pouch.  The other end of the strap is stitched to the back of the pouch.

This pouch is made from 3-4 oz vegetable tanned leather and the strap of 6 oz leather.  It is hand stitched with waxed linen thread and stained with vinegar and iron for a blue/black color.

Vinegar and iron is a period stain for leather and wood.   I like it because it is quick and easy to apply, doesn’t require a lot of stain, is permanent and doesn’t rinse out.   It works by reacting with the tannic acid in the leather.

This pouch has the flap tooled with a typical English pattern using an hand made star stamp.   Unfortunately,  this leather didn’t take tooling as well as I would have liked.  Some leather works better than others.

Mid 18th Century shot pouch - Bag #34 - Flap
Mid 18th Century shot pouch – Bag #34 – Flap
Mid 18th Century shot pouch - Bag #34 - Open Flap
Mid 18th Century shot pouch – Bag #34 – Open Flap

If I can make a pouch like this for you,  use the Contact page to initiate an order.  The bespoke price for this pouch is $180.   The tooling is an extra $20.    The shipping on a single bag is $15.   Sales tax of at least 5.3% (higher in some areas) will be added to orders shipped to a Virginia address.

Fur Trade Era Shot or Hunting Pouches

Golden Age of Hunting Pouches

Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch - Pouch #29 - Full Front
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch – Pouch #29 – Full Front

For many years I have concentrated on 18th century shot pouches and simple mountain shot pouches.   These are generally small and of simple construction.   Some may have been made by harness makers but most were home made.    When we get to the 19th century,   the shot pouch or hunting pouch became a larger and more sophisticated affair more likely to have been professionally made.  The golden age of the hunting pouch coincides with the American Fur Trade era of about 1816 to 1850.

Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch - Pouch #29 - Full Back
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch – Pouch #29 – Full Back

This page features two similar Fur Trade Era hunting pouches with some sophisticated features.   Both  pouches feature a fringed welt and rolled bindings. The rolled bindings are along the edge of the flap and along the inside of the opening at the top of the front of the pouch.   The welts go where the front and back of the pouch attach to the gusset.    Both pouches have a  small internal pocket and a period printed fabric lining.   Additionally,  the straps pass through the apron at the top of the bag and attach to the inside of the pouch.  Both bags are made of 2-3 oz vegetable tanned cowhide or calfskin and 3-4 oz  (new pouches have 6 oz straps)  leather straps.

A Medium Single Hunting Pouch

This medium size single (one compartment)  pouch is about 8″ x 10″ overall, including the fringe.    The working part of the pouch is about 7″ x 7″.   The strap can usually be made up to at least 60″ and is adjusted with a brass buckle.    The flap has a little tooling on it.   I just couldn’t help but add a little decoration of a few diagonal lines.  I hope you agree that the whole bag has a very neat and professional appearance.

As are all my leather products, this pouch is hand stitched with waxed linen thread.    This bag is stitched at 8 stitches per inch.    I have used my standard vinegar and iron stain for a dark brown to black finish.   The bag is slightly aged and distressed.

Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch - Pouch #29 - Back
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch – Pouch #29 – Back
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch - Pouch #29 - Front
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch – Pouch #29 – Front
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch - Pouch #29
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch – Pouch #29
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch - Pouch #29 - Inside
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch – Pouch #29 – Inside
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch - Pouch #29 - Inside Pocket
Fur Trade Era Hunting Pouch – Pouch #29 – Inside Pocket

A Small Single Hunting Pouch

Pouch #30 - A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch - Front
Pouch #30 – A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch – Front

Shown here is a slightly smaller version of the bag above.  I actually like the shape a little better.

Pouch #30 - A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch - Back
Pouch #30 – A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch – Back

This small single (one compartment)  pouch is about 7.5″ x 8″ overall, including the fringe.    The working part of the pouch is roughly  6″ x 4.5″.   The main compartment is just a little bigger than my hand.  The strap is up to about 55″ top of bag to top of bag and is adjusted with a brass buckle.   The strap can be shortened, if necessary,  for the eventual owner.

As are all my leather products, this pouch is hand stitched with waxed linen thread.    This bag is stitched at 8 stitches per inch.    I have used my standard vinegar and iron stain for a dark brown to black finish.   The bag is slightly aged and distressed.

Pouch #30 - A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch
Pouch #30 – A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch
Pouch #30 - A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch - Inside
Pouch #30 – A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch – Inside
Pouch #30 - A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch - Inside Pocket
Pouch #30 – A small Fur Trade Era hunting pouch – Inside Pocket

Bespoke Pricing for Similar Fur Trade Pouches

  • Single Fur Trade Pouch (like #29 or #30)- $550 plus $25 shipping/insurance
  • Leather Powder Horn Hangers – $30 (Option with a pouch order)
  • Leather knife sheath attached to back of pouch – $45 (Option with a pouch order – client must provide knife)

Use the Contact Form to let me know if you would like to have a pouch made like #29 or #30.

Southern Mountain Shot Pouches & Powder Horns

Southern Heart Shaped Shot Pouch

Heart shaped southern mountain shot pouch and powder horn
Bag #11, Horn #7 – Full Front
Heart shaped southern mountain shot pouch and powder horn
Bag #11, Horn #7 – Full Back

Most of the southern mountain shot pouches shown on this page were copied from Jim Webb’s book Sketches of Hunting Pouches, Powder Horns, and Accoutrements of Southern Appalachia. I made the first, heart shaped, shot pouches pictured here exactly as shown on pages 18-19; approximately 7.5″wide x 7.5″ high, using 3-4oz  (straps on the new bags are 6 oz) vegetable tanned cowhide and linen thread.This shot pouch design consists of a one piece back and flap with a front panel attached via a 1″ gusset that goes around the entire pouch and attaches to the strap.  The strap can  generally be cut up to at least 60″ top of bag to top of bag.

Back of heart shaped southern mountain shot pouch
Bag #11, Horn #7 – Back

The shot pouch is assembled such that the flesh sides are stitched together without a welt, and the bag is not turned. This results in the gusset folding inward. It is an unusual arrangement, but that is how the original was constructed. I used an iron buckle on the strap to allow for seasonal adjustment. The leather was stained with vinegar and iron. The strap is about 60″ and can be shortened as much as necessary just by punching new holes for the buckle.

Southern mountain shot pouch and powder horn
Bag #11, Horn #7 – Front

The attached powder horn is based on several original powder horns from Southwest Virginia. It is about 13″ around the outside curve with a 2 1/2″ base plug. This seemingly simple horn has carved integral rings and is as much work as a banded, applied-tip horn. It is hand filed and scraped with a turned walnut base plug attached using hand forged nails. A turned walnut stopper finishes the horn. The horn is dyed yellow with aquafortis and appropriately aged.

Below is an heart shaped pouch outfit that I made for myself with a slightly different horn.  This horn has an turned applied collar instead of integral rings, and is based on the horn on pages 228-229 in Jay Hopkins book Bone Tipped and Banded Horns.    It is about 12 1/2″ around the outside curve with a 2 1/4″ turned maple base plug.   The stopper is also maple.

Bag #24, Horn #24 - A powder horn with a turned base plug and a applied turned collar - Front
Bag #24, Horn #24 – A powder horn with a turned base plug and a applied turned collar – Front
Bag #24, Horn #24 - A powder horn with a turned base plug and a applied turned collar - Back
Bag #24, Horn #24 – A powder horn with a turned base plug and a applied turned collar – Back
 

The heart shaped shot pouch (#56) below is paired with a small banded, applied-tip powder horn (#67). The horn is 13″ around the outside curve (not including the stopper), 11 3/4″ tip to tip, with a 1 15/16″ diameter cherry base plug that has been hollowed out about 3/4 of its length. The tip is two pieces consisting of both Axis and White Tail deer antler. The strap is about 51″ top of bag to top of bag which can be adjusted around 4″ either way with an iron buckle. It can, of course, be shortened. A measure set has been included with this outfit that can be calibrated to the customer’s specifications up to about 100gr.

This oufit is currently available for $580 plus $20-$25 USPS Priority Mail shipping and any applicable VA sales tax. Please Contact me if you are interested and mention Bag #56 and Horn #67.

Bag #56, Horn #67 – Heart Shaped Shot Pouch with an banded, applied-tip powder horn.
Bag #56, Horn #67 – Heart Shaped Shot Pouch with an banded, applied-tip powder horn – Front
Bag #56, Horn #67 – Heart Shaped Shot Pouch with an banded, applied-tip powder horn – Back

Please Contact me if you are interested and mention Bag #56 and Horn #67.

Below are two heart shaped shot pouches with plain powder horns  that are much more typical of what you would find in the southern mountains.  The bottom outfit uses linen cord and chain to attach all the accouterments, much as it would have in the period.

Pouch #27 and Horn #28 - A typical southern shot pouch and powder horn outfit.
Bag #27,  Horn #28 – A heart shaped shot pouch with a plain carved throat powder horn
Horn #3 - Bag #8 -  A plain southern powder horn attached by linen cord to a Southern heart shaped shot pouch.
Bag #8, Horn #3 – Another heart shaped shot pouch with a very plain powder horn

Typical One Piece Shot Pouch

Bag #57, Horn #68- Typical Mountain Shot Pouch

This is a very typical one piece rectangular shot pouch based on the one shown on pages 14-15 of Jim Webb’s book. It is just one piece of leather stitched up the sides with a welt and then turned inside out. I added the welt since the pouch was to be turned. The original did not have one. The pouch measures about 7″ wide by about 8″ high.  The strap can generally  be cut up to at least 60″ top of bag to top of bag.

The attached horn (#68) is very similar to Horn #24 shown above.    It has a turned base plug and an turned, applied collar.  It is about 13″ around the outside curve (not including the stopper), 11 1/2″ tip to tip, with an approximately  2 9/16″diameter black walnut base plug which is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.  The stopper is also black walnut. This is light horn that will hold a lot of powder.  

The pouch body and strap are made from 3-4 oz (6 oz strap) vegetable tanned cowhide.   An iron buckle is used to provide about 4″ of adjustment either way. The strap is about 53″ top of bag to top of bag and can, of course, be shortened.   The leather is stained with vinegar and iron and finished with mink oil for a dark brown color.

This outfit is currently available for $420 plus $20-25 USPS Priority Mail shipping and any applicable VA sales tax. If you are interested, just Contact me and mention Bag #57 and Horn #68. I can make you a measure set for an extra $55.  

Bag #57, Horn #68 – Typical Mountain Shot Pouch – Front
Bag #57, Horn #68 – Typical Mountain Shot Pouch – Back

If you are interested, just Contact me and mention Bag #57 and Horn #68.

Small Two Piece Shot Pouch

Bag #25, Horn #27 - An outfit for a southern squirrel rifle
Bag #25, Horn #27 – An outfit for a southern squirrel rifle

This shot pouch is shown on pages 16-17 of Jim Webb’s book.  It is a very simple two piece (back with flap, and front)  pouch flat sewn along the bottom and up the sides  with a brass button holding the flap closed.  It is little under  7″ wide  x 6″ high.   It is basically just large enough for your hand, and I would only expect to  carry a few balls, some patch material, and maybe a measure and a couple flints.      I imagine it being carried with a squirrel rifle and paired it with a very small banded screw-tip horn for just a few shots.   

The horn is about 10 1/2″ around the outside curve (staple to stopper) with a base plug about 2 1/8″ in diameter.  It is straight so it can be correct as either a left or right hand carry, and has been setup as a right hand carry.  I figure it might hold 10 shots worth of powder for a small caliber rifle.   

The pouch body and strap are made from 3-4 oz (new pouches have 6 oz straps) vegetable tanned cowhide.   An iron buckle is used for strap adjustment.   The strap can generally  be cut up to at least 60″ top of bag to top of bag.   The leather is stained with vinegar and iron for a blue-black color and finished with mink oil and black shoe polish.  

Bag #25, Horn #27 - An outfit for a southern squirrel rifle
Bag #25, Horn #27 – An outfit for a southern squirrel rifle
Bag #25, Horn #27 - An outfit for a southern squirrel rifle
Bag #25, Horn #27 – An outfit for a southern squirrel rifle

Cloth and Leather Pouch

Shown here is a very practical pouch made from pillow ticking and a bit of leather for the flap.   The bag is approximately 8″x 10″ and fully lined in that there are no raw edges showing on the inside.   I could also make it 12″x 14″ to be a haversack which is shown below. White canvas is also an option with a pillow ticking lining. A leather reinforcement has been placed on the inside of the bag and stitched to the flap.   The leather strap is stitched to the flap and internal reinforcement and is adjusted by an iron buckle.  

Pouch #31 - Pillow ticking and leather pouch - Front
Pouch #31 – Pillow ticking and leather pouch – Front
Pouch #31 - Pillow ticking and leather pouch - Front
Pouch #31 – Pillow ticking and leather pouch – Front
Pouch #31 - Pillow ticking and leather pouch - Inside
Pouch #31 – Pillow ticking and leather pouch – Inside
Pouch #54 – Haversack form in white canvas

Bespoke Pricing for Shot Pouches & Powder Horns

Bespoke Pricing for items like the ones shown above is as follows:

  • Southern Heart Shaped Shot Pouch (like #11) – $200 plus shipping
  • Southern One Piece Shot Pouch (like #26) – $190 plus shipping
  • Small Two Piece Shot Pouch (like #25)- $180 plus shipping
  • Pillow Ticking and Leather Pouch (like #31) – $180 plus shipping
  • Leather Powder Horn Hangers – $30 (Option with a pouch order)
  • Leather sheath for a small knife attached to back of pouch – $45 (Option with a pouch order – client must provide knife)
  • Leather sheath for a large rifleman’s knife to be hung from a belt – $85 (client must provide knife)
  • Plain Southern Powder Horn with a flat base plug (with staple)  and  a simple carved throat and spout (like #3 or #28) – $150 plus shipping
  • Southern Powder Horn with a Turned Base Plug, and a carved throat and spout with integral rings (like #7)  – $275 plus shipping
  • Southern Powder Horn with a Turned Base Plug and a  applied collar (#24 or #29) – $200 plus shipping.
  • Multiple Banded Screw-tip Powder Horn (like #27) – $295 plus shipping
  • Tin Powder Measure, Whipped Brush and Pick set (as shown with Bag #11) – $55

Priority shipping and insurance on a single item is $15. Shipping on an outfit is $20.  Shipping of the high value items is $25.  I will collect VA Sales Tax for items shipping to VA residents.

If you would like something similar to what is shown on this page, or even something completely different, use the Contact form to send me an e-mail. See FAQ for more information on purchasing custom work.

The availability of any particular horn design depends on the availability of an appropriate unfinished horn in my inventory.

I try to make all my recreated shot pouches and horns look used. That means adding wrinkles, puckers, perhaps some cracks, and a bit of dirt and oil.  I leave normal blemishes in the leather that add some character.

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point toward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

 

Virginia Applied Tip Powder Horns

Applied tip powder horns, as the name implies, have turned horn, antler, or bone tips that either screw onto or are pinned to the powder horn body.  These are professionally made horns that had turned butt plugs as well, and sometimes turned horn bands. Screw-tip powder horns were made as early as the French and Indian War in Philadelphia and spread west into Pennsylvania and south into Virginia and North Carolina.   The best supported explanation for the purpose of screw-tip powder horns, as presented by Art DeCamp, is that the turned screw-tips (and other applied tips ) allowed for the mass production of powder horns where each step of the manufacturing process could be handled by one person.    Turned horn bands and turned wood base plugs served the same purpose.   By turning all these parts,  a fancy powder horn could be made quickly by professional horners.

I performed all the steps myself for the screw-tip powder horns displayed below.   Each is an example of a Virginia screw-tip powder horn.   The single turned band is the defining feature of a Virginia powder horn.   The shape of the base plug is characteristic of powder horns from the middle portion of the Valley of Virginia.   As with most southern screw-tip powder horns, the screw-tips on the powder horns below have an internal thread.   The powder horn bodies have an external thread.  Both these horns have turned walnut stoppers.   Both screw-tips are dyed to match the base plugs and stoppers   The band on Horn #5 below is also dyed horn.   The base plug on Horn #5 is maple stained with aqua fortis.   The base plug on Horn #6 is walnut.   Both powder horns are stained with aqua fortis and aged.

I will make any banded, screw-tip powder horn, with a turned base plug like the ones shown here for $275 plus shipping. See FAQ for more information on ordering custom work.

Horn #5 - Outside curve of small Virginia screw-tip powder horn with single band.
Horn #5 – 13 1/2″ outside curve , 2 1/4″ dia. base plug

Horn #5 - Top of small Virginia screw-tip powder horn with band.
Horn #5 – Top

top of single banded, screw-tip powder horn
Horn #6 – Top

Side view of single banded, screw-tip powder horn
Horn #6 – 15″ outside curve , 2 3/4″ dia. base plug

 Horn #26 - A slightly smaller version of Horn #6 - 15" around the outside curve, 2 3/8" dia. base plug
Horn #26 – A slightly smaller version of Horn #6 – 15″ around the outside curve, 2 3/8″ dia. base plug

Horn #21 - A slightly different banded, screw-tip horn - 14 1/2" outside curve, 2 3/8" base plug
Horn #21 – A slightly different banded, screw-tip horn – 14 1/2″ outside curve, 2 3/8″ dia. base plug

Below is another kind of applied tip powder horn. This one is based on an early Virginia horn documented in Jay Hopkins book;
Bone Tipped & Banded Horns, Vol 1; pp. 138-9. This horn has a pinned turned antler tip. The butt plug and stopper are turned curly maple. The wood, horn, and antler were stained with aqua fortis (iron nitrate). The butt plug and tip were pinned with steel (iron on the original) wire pins.

Horn #20 - 16" outside curve, 13" tip to tip, 2.5&quot dia. butt plug
Horn #20 – 16″ outside curve, 13″ tip to tip, 2 1/2″ dia. butt plug

I will make a similar pinned tip horn with a turned base plug for $250 plus shipping. See FAQ for more information on ordering custom work.

If I can make a powder horn for you, use the Contact form to send me an e-mail. The availability of any particular horn design depends on the availability of an appropriate unfinished horn in my inventory.

Right or Left Hand Carry for Powder Horns?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point toward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

Early Virginia Shot Pouch & Powder Horn

Early VA shot pouch and powder horn
Bag #10, Horn #6 – Full Front (Click for larger image)

Shown here is an outfit that I made for myself consisting of an early Virginia shot pouch and a Virginia banded, screw-tip powder horn. Most of the shot pouches made these days are relatively complicated affairs using designs from the early to middle 19th century. If you want a shot pouch that is proper for the 18th century, take a close look at this shot pouch and powder horn.  I put together an outfit that I felt would be proper for 1775 on the Virginia frontier.

There are very few examples of shot pouches from the 18th century.  So, I was fortunate to be able to study an original early Virginia shot pouch that matches the size and construction of another published (Clash of Empires exhibition catalog, p. 30) pouch known to date to the period of the French and Indian War.  This original Virginia shot pouch was documented by Wallace Gusler in the December 2009 Muzzle Blasts(pp. 4-8).

The original one piece pouch is square at the bottom (although the corners look rounded due to use) and stitched up the sides with a very fine stitch very close to the edge. A divider that is open at the bottom serves as a welt between the front and the back of the bag. A pewter flap button is anchored to a stag horn button on the inside of the pouch. The stag horn button was covered by a round piece of leather that served to prevent the user’s hand from catching on the button. The flap extends approximately halfway down the front of the bag and has a slight beaver tail shape with a welted edge.

Early VA Shot Pouch & Powder Horn
Bag #10, Horn #6 – Front (Click for larger image)

The original bag did not have a strap attached and was missing part of the leather at one attachment point. However, there was evidence of a strap stitched to one side and a button hole on the other side. Actually, it was just a rough cut hole through which two buttons might have been tied to each other. Wallace Gusler indicated in his article that he believed two linked buttons (as in a cufflink) connected the strap to the bag using the button hole. The hole on the original pouch went through the welt and front of the bag as the back was torn away at that spot. I believe, the button was originally placed on the inside of the back and eventually pulled through tearing the back. That is why I did not run the button hole all the way through all three layers of leather on my recreation of the pouch.

I have made a number of hunting pouches based on this original. I have generally maintained the size and shape but varied the construction (i.e. external vs. internal stitching), the type of strap (i.e. leather vs. woven) and the type of attachment (i.e. location and number of buttons) for the strap. The original pouch actually appears to have rounded corners due to wear, and I made several copies that way before I realized that it was an optical illusion. Even in this very close copy, I still rounded the corners slightly in order to give the bag a finished look.

Not having Russia leather (a thin, textured, red dyed leather commercially available in the 18th century for upholstery work) which was most likely used to create the original, I created my copy of the original using 3-4 oz (may use 2-3 oz for some parts and 6oz for the strap) vegetable tanned cowhide which I stained using aqua fortis to give a dark brown color.  I normally use vinegar and iron as a stain on my bags which usually gives more of a blue-black color. This bag is approximately the same size as the original at about 7″ square.  Just like the original, this pouch has a center divider as the welt and is stitched up the sides. In Bag #10, I rolled and hemmed the edge of the flap instead of using a welted edge. I now make these bags using a welted flap just like the original. I maintained the same flap button attachment as the original with an internal horn button used as an anchor for the external pewter flap button.    A leather cover is sewn over the internal button to prevent the hand from catching on it.

Bag #10, Horn #6 - Back
Bag #10, Horn #6 – Back (Click for larger image)

As for the strap, I attached it in a manner as close to the original as I could ascertain. One end of the strap is stitched to the right side (as worn on the right side), and the other end is attached to
the bag using a single small pewter button anchored to another small pewter button on the inside of the pouch. The strap may then be seasonally adjusted using buttonholes in the end of the strap. I usually only cut one set (strap and powder horn hangers) of button holes for the requested strap length, but more holes can be cut as required to adjust the strap.

Early VA shot pouch front panel decoration
Bag #10 – Front Decoration (Click for larger image)

The original pouch was decorated with stamped stars, some forming the initials of the owner. Consequently, I made a matching stamp to decorate my pouch. However, I decided to get a little fancier with a more refined design. I added diagonal lines reminiscent of English checkering patterns. On the bags shown below, I used the same stamp to create the owners initials and to do a Sun, Moon, and stars motif. In fact, I liked the Sun, Moon, and stars design so much, I used it on two bags, one of them is shown below.

 
Early VA banded, screw-tip powder horn
Early VA banded, screw-tip powder horn; Horn #6 (Click for larger image)

I attached to the bag a Virginia single banded screw-tip horn that is similar to an original dated 1774.  The horn is approximately 15″ around the outside curve with a 2 3/4″ base plug. The base plug and stopper are turned walnut with the base plug attached with wooden pegs. The screw-tip and band are horn. The screw-tip is dyed to match the walnut. Hand forged staples are installed in the the base plug and throat for the attachment of the hangers. The hangers are attached to the bag strap with buttons just as the strap is attached to the bag. This attachment method is purely conjecture on my part, but I think it makes sense to be able to adjust the hanger attachment location as the strap length is adjusted. The horn is dyed yellow with aqua fortis and appropriately aged.

I distress the leather on most of my pouches to give them a used appearance. That means adding wrinkles, scuffs and scratches as well as a coat of black shoe polish to simulate a little dirt and grime. I try not to overdue it so that the function of the bag is compromised. I don’t generally distress the leather to be used on a bag that is to be highly tooled.

You might think that this bag is too small at about 7″ square.  I can assure you that it is not.   Period documentation indicates that most longhunters carried hunting pouches of this size.  They would just carry what they needed to shoot the gun. This generally meant a bullet mold, some bullets, patches, tow, and a wiper. A powder horn and powder measure with a vent pick and brush were generally hung from the strap.

In my bag, I keep some tow, a strip of pre-lubricated pillow ticking for shooting patches, five balls, two flints wrapped in leather, and a turn screw of a type typically used with muskets.  A turn screw would not have normally been found in an original hunting pouch as a longhunter would most likely have used their knife to turn the screws on their gun. However, being a gunsmith, I just can’t bring myself to risk tearing up my screw heads like that. All that said, this bag is plenty big for the listed items. I hang a pan brush, vent pick, and powder measure from either the pouch strap or powder horn hanger.  I made those from recycled tin plated steel from a cookie tin. I have attached small knife to the back of the pouch to use as a patch knife. The period longhunters would most likely have just carried a store bought butcher knife in their belt.  This is certainly all you need for a day of hunting and more than you need to carry to the line when shooting at the range.

Shown below are four more pouch and horn outfits very similar to the bag shown above.   They are of the same basic design with different tooling. The bottom two outfits have a different type of early Virginia horn. Horn #21 was made to the client’s specification and is not based on a particular original. They all have a welted flap just like the original, and I am currently making all these style bags that way.

Please note that I no longer hang the powder horn as high as shown on most of the bags shown on this page.    I have found that the outfit works better if you hang the horn below the flap button as in Bag #20/Horn #20 so that you can open the flap without moving the horn out of the way.    I will, of course, hang the horn where you want with the hangers as long (or short) as you want.    I  have made the hangers all lengths but tend to think about 8″ is long enough.   You can just tip the horn up to pour the powder.

 

Bag #17, Horn #16
Bag #17, Horn #16; This bag is tooled with the initials of the owner.

Bag #18, Horn #17 with Sun, Moon & Stars motif.
Bag #18, Horn #17 with Sun, Moon & Stars motif.

Pouch #20 with Horn #20  (Front) - Early VA style shot pouch with an early VA style powder horn with a turned antler tip and turned base plug
Bag #20,  Horn #20 with full tooling and a different early VA horn with an applied antler tip.

 

Bag #21, Horn #21, with just flap tooling and a completely custom powder
Bag #21, Horn #21, with just flap tooling and a powder horn with a screw-tip and a turned base plug with a band .

Below is an outfit available for sale that is very similar to the original Bag #10 and Horn #6.   It consists of Bag #55 and Horn #66.   The shot pouch has been tooled on the flap with stars and on the front below the flap with diamonds and stars.   The single banded, screw-tip horn is about 14″ around the outside curve (not including the stopper), 11 3/4″ tip to tip, with a 2 7/16″ diameter black walnut base plug.  The base plug was hollowed out about half its length.  This is a fairly light horn that will accommodate a good amount of powder.  The strap is about 53″ top of bag to top of bag with around 4″ of adjustment either way.   The strap can be shortened.   A tin measure set has been attached to the bag with about a 100gr powder capacity.  It can be calibrated to the customers requirements prior to shipment. 

The price of the outfit is $585 plus $20-$25 for USPS Priority Mail shipping and any applicable VA sales tax.   If you are interested,  Contact me and mention Bag #55 and Horn #66; the Early VA outfit.

Bag #55, Horn #66 - Early VA shot pouch with a VA single banded, screw-tip powder horn.
Bag #55, Horn #66 – Early VA shot pouch with a VA single banded, screw-tip powder horn.

Bag #55, Horn #66 - Early VA shot pouch with a VA single banded, screw-tip powder horn - Front
Bag #55, Horn #66 – Early VA shot pouch with a VA single banded, screw-tip powder horn – Front

Bag #55, Horn #66 - Early VA shot pouch with a VA single banded, screw-tip powder horn - Back
Bag #55, Horn #66 – Early VA shot pouch with a VA single banded, screw-tip powder horn – Back

If you are interested,  Contact me and mention Bag #55 and Horn #66; the Early VA outfit.

You can obtain your very own pouch and horn outfit made to order like the ones shown above for the following prices:

  • Plain Early Virginia Shot Pouch (as shown above but without tooling) – $200 plus shipping
  • Powder Horn Hangers for Early Virginia Shot Pouch – $35 (Option with a pouch order)
  • Decorative Tooling on Early Virginia Shot Pouch – $20 (Option with a pouch order)
  • Leather knife sheath for customer provided knife – $45 (Option with a pouch order – customer must provide knife)
  • Virginia Banded, Screw-tip Powder Horn – $275 plus shipping
  • Virginia applied tip Powder Horn – $250 plus shipping
  • Tin Powder Measure, Brush and Pick set – $55

Priority shipping and insurance on a single item is $20. Shipping on an outfit is $25.   I will collect VA Sales Tax for items shipping to VA residents.

 

To order a pouch or horn like the ones shown above, or to discuss a different project, use the Contact form to send me an e-mail. See FAQ for more information on purchasing custom work. The availability of any particular horn design depends on the availability of an appropriate unfinished horn in my inventory.

Plain Southern Powder Horns

The vast majority of original powder horns were as plain as they could be and still be functional. That means a flat pine (or other softwood) base plug and little or no carving of the throat; just enough work to contain powder and attach a strap. Many times a screw was used to attach a strap to the base plug. A grooved or simply reduced throat is enough to tie a strap around it. The two powder horns shown just below are based on an original southwest Virginia horn and are a little fancier than most with a turned base plug and carved rings at the throat. Even so, it is still much plainer than the carved and engraved horns from the French and Indian War. This horn could also be made with a turned and applied collar instead of the integral rings. The horn would dictate how it is approached.

Horn #7 - Side
Horn #7 – A SW. VA style powder horn

Horn #19 - A SW. VA horn in the basic style of Horn #7.
Horn #19 – A SW. VA horn in the basic style of Horn #7.

Please note the raw linen cord used to attach the horn in the photo below.   Cord was often found on southern outfits.    The outfit show below is much more historically correct for a southern mountain rifle than many of the sophisticated shot pouches and powder horns being recreated today.    Most of the original powder horns and shot pouches were very simple affairs, well worn and patched together.   You will see horns completely covered in leather to patch a hole or holes rather than just throw it away.   Even something as simple as a plain powder horn could not be easily replaced in the southern mountains and was highly valued.

I will make any plain powder horn with a flat base plug and simply carved throat and spout for $150 plus shipping. A horn like #7 with a turned, flat or domed base plug and carved rings would cost $275 plus shipping.

To order a powder horn or discuss any other project, use the Contact form to send me an e-mail. See FAQ for more information on ordering custom work. The availability of any particular horn design depends on the availability of an appropriate unfinished horn in my inventory.

Horn #3 - Bag #8 - A plain southern powder horn attached by linen cord to a Southern heart shaped shot pouch laying on a flat surface.
Horn #3 – Plain southern powder horn, Bag #8 – Southern Heart Shaped Shot Pouch

Horn #4 - Plain southern powder horn, 10 3/4" outside curve, 2 1/2" dia. base plug
Horn #4 – Plain southern powder horn, 10 3/4″ outside curve, 2 1/2″ dia. base plug

Horn #4 - Top of plain southern powder horn with a wedding ring carved at the end of a bell shaped tip.
Horn #4 – Top – Plain southern powder horn

Horn #8 - Top of a plain southern powder horn wiht a large wedding band carved a the beginning of a bell shaped tip just above the throat.
Horn #8 – Top – Plain southern powder horn

Horn #8 - Plain southern powder horn, 10 1/4" outside curve, 2 3/8" dia. base plug
Horn #8 – Plain southern powder horn, 10 1/4″ outside curve, 2 3/8″ dia. base plug

Plain southern powder horn with octagonal shaped tip.
Horn #9 – Plain Southern Powder Horn, 11″ outside curve, 2 1/2″ dia. base plug

Top view of plain southern powder horn with an octacgonal tip.
Horn #9 – Top – Plain southern powder horn

Right or Left Hand Carry Powder Horns?

There are both right hand and left hand powder horns shown above.   The question is what does that mean.   It refers to the side on which you carry the horn.   The tip always points forward and should wrap around your body.    In other words, the tip should not jut out so that it can catch on a passing object.

Technically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would technically be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn for sale,  I will tell you whether a horn is technically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

Tin Powder Measure Set

This is a powder measure set that I created for Bag #12. It consists of a tin-plated steel powder measure, pan brush and vent pick.  The pan brush is horse hair with a tin ferrule and the vent pick is made of music wire.   Three flats are ground on the end of the vent pick to use in scraping out the touch hole. I can make you a powder measure set like this for $55 plus $9 for shipping. I will make just a measure for $25 plus $9 shipping.  Additional measures are $15 each.

If you are interested in this pan brush and powder measure set or one like it, use the Contact form to send me an e-mail. See FAQ for more information on purchasing custom work.

Tin powder measure, pan brush, and pick