18th Century Suit of Clothes

I have been meaning for some time to make myself a set of late 18th century clothing to wear to longrifle culture events.   As my weight has stabilized at a reasonably healthy level and I had the time due to the pandemic, I decided to get this project done.     I made an 18th century English work shirt, some drop front breeches, and a 1770’s style waistcoat.   The shirt was made of a blue checked cotton and completely hand sewn.   I will not do that again; particularly since I need to make another, smaller, shirt.    The breeches and waistcoat were mostly machine sewn with hand sewing for things like hems and button holes.    I used natural cotton duck for the breeches and blue wool with a red cotton print lining for the waistcoat.

 

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Fraktur Painted Blanket Chest

Given that my work fell off by about half this year due to the pandemic economic downturn,  I started to fill my time with personal projects.  This blanket chest has been on my personal project list for some time.    I finally got it finished.   This chest is approximately 50″ L x 24″ W x 28” H and is made up of six glued up pine panels.   It is assembled with hand cut dovetails.  The bottom, apron, and lid edges are all pegged in place.

The painted finish started with a deep red base of furniture paint.   That was then covered with a sponge applied black acrylic glaze.   The fraktur painted panels used acrylic gesso as a base.   The fraktur designs were painted in acrylic artist’s paints.

This item is not for sale and I do not intend to make another one.    Its size made it very difficult to build by myself in my small shop.  It was still a little smaller than most of the originals.

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Artisan Book Series – Mark Elliott

I have been honored by the publication of a book about my life and work by the Contemporary Longrifle Association.  This book includes a longer  biography than I have included on this website and  high quality glossy color photos of my best work.   If you are a collector of my work, you will want to have this book to accompany your collection.

You can order the book for $20 directly from the Contemporary Longrifle Association at this link; https://store.longrifle.com/shop/cla-publications/artisan-book-series-mark-elliott/.

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Early Virginia Powder Horn with Color Scrimshaw

Shown here is a bespoke powder horn with color scrimshaw.   The form of the horn is Early Virginia with a turned  beaded hard maple base plug and a turned Axis deer antler tip.  This right hand  horn is approximately 14.75″ around the outside curve, 12.25″ tip to tip, and with a 2.375″ diameter base plug.    Per the clients specification, the horn is engraved with a male and a female Cardinal, dogwood flowers, tobacco leaves and a cornucopia.   A little color was added to the birds.  The horn and base plug is stained with ferric nitrate and the entire horn finished in Tried & True (linseed oil and beeswax).

This horn is not available, but I can make you something like it.   Just contact me with your ideas and we can discuss it. The bespoke price for a horn like this one with a turned base plug and turned applied tip is $215.   Engraving is generally an extra $200.  Added color is $100.   Shipping on a single horn generally runs $20-$25.    Appropriate sales tax will be collected  for Virginia residents.

Horn #57 - Early VA Powder Horn with Color Scrimshaw showing a male Cardinal and dogwood flowers.
Horn #57 – Early VA Powder Horn with Color Scrimshaw showing a male Cardinal and dogwood flowers.

Horn #57 - Early VA Powder Horn with Color Scrimshaw showing a female Cardinal and a cornucopia.
Horn #57 – Early VA Powder Horn with Color Scrimshaw showing a female Cardinal and a cornucopia.

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point to ward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

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Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch

I decided to try my hand at the embroidered diary case/shot pouch on pages 34-37 of Jim Webb’s book on shot pouches and powder horns of Southern Appalachia. This is my interpretation of that bag and I made it for myself.   I doubt anyone would pay me to make such a small and expensive bag.

I made a few changes.  I only put one extra layer of leather in the flap instead of the three of the original and only created one front pocket instead of the original two.   This reduced the number of layers of leather I had to sew through to a max of five.   I also used 2 oz veg tan cow hide instead of buckskin.   I used 6 oz veg tan cow hide for the strap.

It took a while to work out the pattern, but the shot pouch actually went together much easier than I expected. I cut out the leather very precisely making sure all the mating edges (and punched holes) lined up exactly. I punched all the holes for the embroidery and used my own design. Once the embroidery was done, I glued the pieces together along the edges using white glue. I think this was the key to being able to easily sew it all together; that and the precise matching of the holes.   In case you were wondering, the glue mostly dissolves away when the bag  was soaked in warm water to turn it.

The bag is stained with vinegar and iron. That was done right after the parts were cut out.  I like vinegar and iron because it is a traditional stain,  It stains through and doesn’t wash out.  I put a lot of Mink oil on the bag once it was all done and dried out.

By the way, the bag finished up a little under about 7″ x 7″.  The original was listed at 6 1/2″.

This bag is not for sale.  However, In the unlikely case you would want me to make you a little shot pouch like this one,  I would charge $550 for it plus $25 shipping and VA sales tax for VA residents.   You would get a different embroidery design on the flap for that money.

Pouch 48 - Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch - Full
Pouch 48 – Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch – Full
Pouch 48 - Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch - Flap
Pouch 48 – Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch – Flap
Pouch 48 - Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch - Inside
Pouch 48 – Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch – Inside
Pouch 48 - Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch - Back
Pouch 48 – Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch – Back

On someone’s recommendation,  I decided to add a little banded southern horn to this pouch.     It is a left hand horn that is fairly straight  and was intended from the beginning to be carried on the right side.  Actually all the horns on my personal outfits are left hand horns carried on the right.   I always thought that worked the best.   It was only later that I learned that historically, left had horns were carried on the left and right hand horns where carried on the right.

This horn (#56) is approximately 12″ around the outside curve, 10″ tip to tip (not including the stopper), with a base plug about 2.5″ in diameter.   The base plug is Cherry, the tip Axis deer antler, and the stopper Black Walnut.  The base plug is hollowed out about half it’s depth.

Pouch 48/ Horn 56 - Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch with a small southern banded powder horn.
Pouch 48/ Horn 56 – Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch with a small southern banded powder horn.
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Two Fraktur Decorated Applied-tip Powder Horns

Small Fraktur Decorated Applied-Tip Powder Horn (#52)

Horn #52 - Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Top
Horn #52 – Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Top
Horn #52 - Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Bottom
Horn #52 – Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Bottom

This small fraktur engraved powder horn (#52) is a traditional left hand carry that can be carried either way.   It is approximately 13.5″ around the outside curve and 10″ tip to tip not including the stopper.   The Cherry base plug is 2.25″ in diameter.   The two piece applied-tip is made of horn and Axis deer antler.   The stopper is Black Walnut.   The horn was lightly stained with ferric nitrate and finished with Tried and True (linseed oil and beeswax).  The horn weighs a little over 6 oz.

This horn is available for sale for $275 plus $25 shipping and insurance.  The bespoke price for a horn like this would be $415.  Sales tax will be collected for Virginia residents.    If you would like this horn,  use the Contact page to let me know and mention Horn #52.

Horn #52 - Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Outside
Horn #52 – Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Outside
Horn #52 - Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Inside
Horn #52 – Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Inside

Medium Fraktur Decorated Banded Applied-tip Powder Horn (#53)

Horn #53 - Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Top
Horn #53 – Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Top
Horn #53 - Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Bottom
Horn #53 – Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Bottom

This larger banded fraktur engraved powder horn (#53)is also a traditional left hand carry that can be carried either way.   It is approximately 16″ around the outside curve and 12.75″ tip to tip not including the stopper.   The Cherry base plug is 2.6″ in diameter and hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.   The two piece applied-tip is made of horn and Axis deer antler.   The stopper is Black Walnut.   The horn was stained light yellow with ferric nitrate and finished with Tried and True (linseed oil and beeswax).  The horn weighs a little under 8 oz.

This horn is available for sale for $275 plus $25 shipping and insurance.  The bespoke price for a horn like this would be $440.  Sales tax will be collected for Virginia residents.  If you would like this horn,  use the Contact page to let me know and mention Horn #53.

Horn #53 - Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Outside
Horn #53 – Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Outside
Horn #53 - Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Inside
Horn #53 – Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Inside

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point to ward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

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Southern Banded Powder Horns

Southern Banded Powder Horns

On this page I have some southern  multi-banded powder horns.   These types of horns are typically found in North Carolina and south.  The single banded horns are covered on the Virginia Applied Tip Powder Horns page.   All these horns have applied tips with most being screw-tips.   If you see something you like,  use the Contact page to get in touch with me, and we can discuss making you a similar horn.

Horn #54 - Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Top
Horn #54 – Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Top
Horn #54 - Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Bottom
Horn #54 – Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Bottom

This medium sized horn (Horn #54) is a traditional right hand carry horn.   It is approximately 14 3/8″ around the outside curve and 12 1/4″ tip to tip not including the Walnut stopper.  The curly Maple base plug is approximately 2 3/4″ in diameter and is hollowed out better than half its length.  The horn weighs a little over 8 oz due to the very dense base plug.  The horn and base plug are stained with ferric nitrate and normally aged.

Horn #54 - Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Outside
Horn #54 – Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Outside
Horn #54 - Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Inside
Horn #54 – Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Inside
Horn #51 - VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #51 – VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #51 - VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Bottom
Horn #51 – VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Bottom

This medium to large sized horn (Horn #51) is a traditional left hand carry inspired by some Early Virginia horns shown in Jay Hopkin’s book Bone Tipped & Banded Horns.  While it is a traditional left hand carry,  it can be carried on the right.  It is 16″ around the outside curve and 12 3/4″ tip to tip not including the stopper.   The Black Walnut base plug is 2.72″ in diameter and hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.   There is also a Black Walnut stopper in the horn screw-tip.  There is no stain on the horn.  It is all finished with Tried & True (linseed oil and beeswax).     This horn is thin and translucent its entire length.  It weighs a little under 8 oz.

Horn #51 - VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #51 – VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #51 - VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #51 – VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #50 - NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #50 – NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #50 - NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Bottom
Horn #50 – NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Bottom

This medium sized horn (Horn #50) is a traditional right hand carry inspired by the horns found in North Carolina.   It is about 14″ around the outside curve and about 11 1/4″ tip to tip.  The walnut base plug  is 2 1/4″ in diameter hollowed out about 3/4 of it’s length.  The applied-tip is Axis deer antler.   The stopper is walnut.

 

 

 

Horn #50 - NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #50 – NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #50 - NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #50 – NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #47 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #47 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #47 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Bottom
Horn #47 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Bottom

This little horn (Horn #47) is a traditional left hand horn, but can be carried either way.    It is about 12″ around the outside curve and 10″ tip to tip.   The walnut base plug is 2.03″ in diameter and hollowed out about 3/4 of it’s length.  The applied-tip is Axis deer antler.  The stopper is walnut.

 

 

Horn #47 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #47 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Outside

 

Horn #47 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #47 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Inside

 

Horn #42 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #42 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #42 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Bottom
Horn #42 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Bottom

The following horn (Horn #42) is historically a right hand carry, but can easily be carried either way.   It is about 14″ finial to tip, not including the stopper,  around the outside curve.   Tip to tip it is 11.5″.  The base plug is 2.41″ in diameter.   The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.  The Axis deer antler tip is pinned on.   The base plug and stopper are both Black Walnut.  There is a slight gap between the base band and the base plug, but it matches the grooves in the base plug.

 

Horn #42 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #42 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #42 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #42 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Inside

The horn below is a particularly small one.   It is pretty straight and could easily be, historically, either a right or a left hand carry;  about 11″ around the outside curve staple to stopper.   The base plug is a little less than 2 1/4″ in diameter.   It has a screw-tip with a female thread.  The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.

Horn #27 - A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.
Horn #27 – A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.
Horn #27 - A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.
Horn #27 – A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.

Horn #31 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - TopThe following horn (Horn #31) is historically a left hand carry, but is  setup as a right hand carry.   It can be carried either side without a problem.  It is about 13 1/2″ staple to stopper around the outside curve.   The base plug is a little less than 2 1/4″ in diameter.  It has a screw-tip with a female thread.  The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.

 

Horn #31 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Inside curve
Horn #31 – Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Inside curve
Horn #31 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Outside curve
Horn #31 – Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Outside curve

Horn #32 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - TopThe following horn (Horn #32) is historically  a left hand carry, but is marked assuming a right hand carry.  It can be carried on either side.    It is about 15″ button to stopper around the outside curve.   The base plug is a little more than 2 3/8″ in diameter.  It has a screw-tip with a female thread.  The base plug is hollowed out about 1/2 of its length.  There  is  a slight gap between the base ring and the base plug, but the horn is air tight.   This horn is also a little on the heavy side at  7.4 oz.   All that being said,  this is still a very nice looking little horn.

Horn #32 - Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Inside Curve
Horn #32 – Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Inside Curve
Horn #32 - Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Outside Curve
Horn #32 – Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Outside Curve
Horn #33 - Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn - Top
Horn #33 – Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn – Top

The following horn (Horn #33) is a big one inspired by some early Virginia horns in Jay Hopkin’s book.  I think it would work well with my early Virginia shot pouch.  It is historically  a right hand carry, but I think it would work better as a left hand carry.    It can be carried on either side.    It is about 17″ button to stopper around the outside curve.   The base plug is a little more than 2 5/8″ in diameter.  It has an applied tip made up from horn and antler.   The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.  This horn is actually very light weight for its size.  It weighs 6.8 oz.

Horn #33 - Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn - Inside
Horn #33 – Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn – Outside
Horn #33 - Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn - Outside
Horn #33 – Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn – Inside

All these multi-banded, applied tip horns are priced at $275 plus shipping for a bespoke horn.   Availability of any particular style, size or carry side of powder horn depends on my stock of raw horns.  If you see something you like,  use the Contact page to get in touch with me, and we can discuss making you a similar horn.

Shipping/insurance on a single multi-banded horn is $20 to $25  depending on destination withing the continental US.   VA residents will have to pay an additional 5.3%  to 7% sales tax depending on their locality.

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point to ward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

 

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Why Black LIves Matter to Me

Given the current unrest and uncertainty over race, as a Christian and a person working a twelve step program of recovery, I have felt challenged and called to write on my experience with racism.   This is my personal story, but I call on all white southerners, like myself, to examine their own story with racism.   For me, this is a first step in making a living amends.

I am a 58 year old white male born into the Jim Crow south in the capital of the Confederacy.  At home I was told that God loved everyone and that I was to treat everyone the same, as I would want to be treated.  However, as a young child, I had to be taught that there were white and colored rest rooms and that I was only to use the white facilities.   In the process, it was also communicated that the white facilities were better.   A young child might be forgiven for concluding that white people were better than colored people and as a white child so was I; especially, since that idea was reinforced in so many other ways.

Black people were not a part of my early life except as servants of one sort or another; janitors, cafeteria workers, and nurses for example.   They were the people who took care of me.   They weren’t my friends or my parent’s friends.   In downtown Richmond, according to my mother,  white folks had free range of downtown everyday except Saturday.    Saturday was reserved for black folks to do their shopping at the white owned stores like Miller & Rhodes or Thalhimers.   Also black folks lived and worked on the north side of Broad Street and white folks lived and worked on the south side of Broad Street.   I can’t remember going to the north side of the street except to drive through or visit the Miller & Rhodes warehouse with my father until I was an adult working where black neighborhoods had been systematically removed to make way for the Coliseum, Convention Center, and various office buildings, including one in which I worked.

I was an adult, working, before I had any real interaction with anybody who was black.   By then, the damage had been done.   I was polite and professional in my interaction with black colleagues in order to do my job, but I can’t say I was comfortable with them or that they became real friends.   On the street, I would be anxious when approaching black men, particularly young black men, usually precipitating some form of distancing, or rolling up my windows if driving.   Somewhere it had been communicated to me and internalized that black men were a threat.

When frustrated or challenged by a black man, I would find myself getting unduly angry, angrier than if I had been similarly challenged by a white man.  I had internalized the idea that black men were supposed to be subservient to me, and was enraged when they dare step out of the role I expected them to inhabit.  I suspect that I am not the only white male with this attitude, and hence the prevalence of the brutalization of black men by the police.

This is why, for me, black lives must matter.   Of course, all lives matter, but black lives matter more in this case because I owe them a living amends for my past attitudes and behaviors even though the expression of my racism may have been subtle.  I suspect, however, that it did not go unnoticed by the black folks I encountered.   I suspect that they were all too used to dealing with white men like me.  At least my racism is now out in the open.   I apologize for it and all the harm I may have done over the years to my black and brown brothers and sisters.   May God keep my racism before my eyes and help me to remove it from my character.   Until he does, black lives matter and I choose to make amends.

Mark Elliott

 

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A Grandfather’s Gift – An Applied-tip Powder Horn with Color Fraktur Scrimshaw (Horn #49)

This traditional right hand powder horn was a gift from a grandfather to his four year old grandson.   He wanted a powder horn with my color fraktur scrimshaw that had his grandson’s name.   I kept the powder horn simple with a relatively plain domed cherry base plug with a finial and turned Axis deer antler tip.   The decoration was also intentionally minimal consisting of the name on the top of the powder horn where it is easily viewed with fraktur flowers and a heart wrapping around the rest of the horn.

The powder horn is 14″ around the outside curve and 11 1/4″ tip to tip not including the walnut stopper.   The base plug is 2 1/4″ in diameter.

 

 

Horn #49 - An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of the owners name, flowers, and a heart - Outside
Horn #49 – An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of the owners name, flowers, and a heart – Outside
Horn #49 - An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of the owners name, flowers, and a heart - Bottom
Horn #49 – An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of the owners name, flowers, and a heart – Bottom
the owners name, flowers, and a heart - Inside
the owners name, flowers, and a heart – Inside
the owners name, flowers, and a heart - Inside
the owners name, flowers, and a heart – Inside
the owners name, flowers, and a heart - Top
the owners name, flowers, and a heart – Top

The bespoke price for a simple applied-tip powder horn is $215.   Scrimshaw adds $200 and color adds another $100.   The availability of any particular style, size or carry side of powder horn depends on my stock of raw horns.  If you would like something like this powder horn,  use the Contact page to get in touch with me, and we can discuss making you a similar horn.

Shipping/insurance a  horn of this value is $25 .   VA residents will have to pay an additional 5.3%  to 7% sales tax depending on their locality.

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point to ward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

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Important – Leather Care

I just wanted to post a quick note about leather care.   Leather dries out and cracks over time.   I recently saw an old bag of mine that had been put away for several years and had cracked badly.   Fortunately,  the leather had not cracked all the way through and the bag could be saved.  It just looks like it is a hundred years old now.  That was not the look I was going for.

To  maintain the appearance and functionality of a shot pouch, hunting bag, or any other leather goods,  I recommend that it be oiled at least once a year; every six months would be better.    I oil my leather goods with a high quality Mink Oil.    Some people prefer Neatsfoot oil   I think it gets a little gummy, but that might depend on the quality of the oil you use.  As to the Mink Oil,  I use Fiebings Mink Oil Paste.

Apply the oil/paste liberally with a rag and rub it in all the nooks and crannies and into the stitches.    You don’t want to leave any white paste.   After you have rubbed the paste in good, wipe off any excess.   Then brush vigorously with a stiff horse hair brush to a sheen.    Your leather item is now good for another six months.

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