Two Fraktur Decorated Applied-tip Powder Horns

Small Fraktur Decorated Applied-Tip Powder Horn (#52)

Horn #52 - Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Top
Horn #52 – Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Top
Horn #52 - Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Bottom
Horn #52 – Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Bottom

This small fraktur engraved powder horn (#52) is a traditional left hand carry that can be carried either way.   It is approximately 13.5″ around the outside curve and 10″ tip to tip not including the stopper.   The Cherry base plug is 2.25″ in diameter.   The two piece applied-tip is made of horn and Axis deer antler.   The stopper is Black Walnut.   The horn was lightly stained with ferric nitrate and finished with Tried and True (linseed oil and beeswax).  The horn weighs a little over 6 oz.

The bespoke price for a horn like this would be $450.  Sales tax will be collected for Virginia residents and shipping would be between $20-$25.    If you would like a horn like this,  use the Contact page to let me know and mention Horn #52.

If you like this, perhaps you might be interested in some of my other fraktur such as my Birth/Baptismal/Marriage Certificates or paintings.

Horn #52 - Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Outside
Horn #52 – Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Outside
Horn #52 - Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Inside
Horn #52 – Small Fraktur engraved applied-tip powder horn- Inside

Medium Fraktur Decorated Banded Applied-tip Powder Horn (#53)

Horn #53 - Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Top
Horn #53 – Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Top
Horn #53 - Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Bottom
Horn #53 – Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Bottom

This larger banded fraktur engraved powder horn (#53)is also a traditional left hand carry that can be carried either way.   It is approximately 16″ around the outside curve and 12.75″ tip to tip not including the stopper.   The Cherry base plug is 2.6″ in diameter and hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.   The two piece applied-tip is made of horn and Axis deer antler.   The stopper is Black Walnut.   The horn was stained light yellow with ferric nitrate and finished with Tried and True (linseed oil and beeswax).  The horn weighs a little under 8 oz.

This horn is available for sale for the reduced price of $375 plus $25 shipping and insurance.  The bespoke price for a horn like this would be $475.  Sales tax will be collected for Virginia residents.  If you would like this horn,  use the Contact page to let me know and mention Horn #53.

If you like this, perhaps you might be interested in some of my other fraktur such as my Birth/Baptismal/Marriage Certificates or paintings.

Horn #53 - Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Outside
Horn #53 – Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Outside
Horn #53 - Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Inside
Horn #53 – Medium Banded, Fraktur engraved, applied-tip powder horn- Inside

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point to ward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

Horn Containers

Shown below are two small engraved horn containers that I made as Christmas gifts. This is the first time I have made this sort of horn container. I had to make a larger mandrel to turn the 3″ plus diameter horn sections. I learned after the fact that I could have straightened taller horn sections on the mandrel. These are less than a couple inches high. I will try some taller containers next time.

I also had to learn to turn facework as I did not have centerwork stock big enough for the Black Walnut tops and bottoms. The tops are hollowed out a bit to give a little more room inside.

I have engraved the horn sections with the initials of the recipients. This is also the first time I have done such large block lettering on a horn. I had to outline the letters and then tediously crosshatch within the outlines. All in all, this was quite the learning experience.

I am glad to say, the gifts seemed to be well received.

Small engraved horn containers with Walnut tops and bottoms.
Small engraved horn containers with Walnut tops and bottoms
Small engraved horn containers with the Walnut tops off.
Small engraved horn containers with the Walnut tops off.

18th Century Suit of Clothes

I have been meaning for some time to make myself a set of late 18th century clothing to wear to longrifle culture events.   As my weight has stabilized at a reasonably healthy level and I had the time due to the pandemic, I decided to get this project done.     I made an 18th century English work shirt, some drop front breeches, and a 1770’s style waistcoat.   The shirt was made of a blue checked cotton and completely hand sewn.   I will not do that again; particularly since I need to make another, smaller, shirt.    The breeches and waistcoat were mostly machine sewn with hand sewing for things like hems and button holes.    I used natural cotton duck for the breeches and blue wool with a red cotton print lining for the waistcoat.

Fraktur Painted Blanket Chest

Given that my work fell off by about half this year due to the pandemic economic downturn,  I started to fill my time with personal projects.  This blanket chest has been on my personal project list for some time.    I finally got it finished.   This chest is approximately 50″ L x 24″ W x 28” H and is made up of six glued up pine panels.   It is assembled with hand cut dovetails.  The bottom, apron, and lid edges are all pegged in place.

The painted finish started with a deep red base of furniture paint.   That was then covered with a sponge applied black acrylic glaze.   The fraktur painted panels used acrylic gesso as a base.   The fraktur designs were painted in acrylic artist’s paints.

This item is not for sale and I do not intend to build another of this size.  However, I might be open to making a much smaller painted chest or box.  If you like this, perhaps you might be interested in some of my other fraktur such as my Birth/Baptismal/Marriage Certificates or paintings.

Artisan Book Series – Mark Elliott

I have been honored by the publication of a book about my life and work by the Contemporary Longrifle Association.  This book includes a longer  biography than I have included on this website and  high quality glossy color photos of my best work.   If you are a collector of my work, you will want to have this book to accompany your collection.

You can order the book for $20 directly from the Contemporary Longrifle Association at this link; https://store.longrifle.com/shop/cla-publications/artisan-book-series-mark-elliott/.

Early Virginia Powder Horn with Color Scrimshaw

Shown here is a bespoke powder horn with color scrimshaw.   The form of the horn is Early Virginia with a turned  beaded hard maple base plug and a turned Axis deer antler tip.  This right hand  horn is approximately 14.75″ around the outside curve, 12.25″ tip to tip, and with a 2.375″ diameter base plug.    Per the clients specification, the horn is engraved with a male and a female Cardinal, dogwood flowers, tobacco leaves and a cornucopia.   A little color was added to the birds.  The horn and base plug is stained with ferric nitrate and the entire horn finished in Tried & True (linseed oil and beeswax).

This horn is not available, but I can make you something like it.   Just contact me with your ideas and we can discuss it. The bespoke price for a horn like this one with a turned base plug and turned applied tip is $250.   Engraving is generally an extra $200.  Added color is $100.   Shipping on a single horn generally runs $20-$25.    Appropriate sales tax will be collected  for Virginia residents.

If you like this, perhaps you might be interested in some of my other fraktur such as my Birth/Baptismal/Marriage Certificates or paintings.

Horn #57 - Early VA Powder Horn with Color Scrimshaw showing a male Cardinal and dogwood flowers.
Horn #57 – Early VA Powder Horn with Color Scrimshaw showing a male Cardinal and dogwood flowers.

Horn #57 - Early VA Powder Horn with Color Scrimshaw showing a female Cardinal and a cornucopia.
Horn #57 – Early VA Powder Horn with Color Scrimshaw showing a female Cardinal and a cornucopia.

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point to ward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch

I decided to try my hand at the embroidered diary case/shot pouch on pages 34-37 of Jim Webb’s book on shot pouches and powder horns of Southern Appalachia. This is my interpretation of that bag.

I made a few changes.  I only put one extra layer of leather in the flap instead of the three of the original and only created one front pocket instead of the original two.   This reduced the number of layers of leather I had to sew through to a max of five.   I also used 2 oz veg tan cow hide instead of buckskin.   I used 6 oz veg tan cow hide for the strap.

It took a while to work out the pattern, but the shot pouch actually went together much easier than I expected. I cut out the leather very precisely making sure all the mating edges (and punched holes) lined up exactly. I punched all the holes for the embroidery and used my own design. Once the embroidery was done, I glued the pieces together along the edges using white glue. I think this was the key to being able to easily sew it all together; that and the precise matching of the holes.   In case you were wondering, the glue mostly dissolves away when the bag  was soaked in warm water to turn it.

The bag is stained with vinegar and iron. That was done right after the parts were cut out.  I like vinegar and iron because it is a traditional stain,  It stains through and doesn’t wash out.  I put a lot of Mink oil on the bag once it was all done and dried out.

By the way, the bag finished up a little under about 7″ x 7″.  The original was listed at 6 1/2″.

This bag with Horn #56 (shown below) is available with a small patch knife (not shown) attached to the strap for the reduced price of $799.   The strap can be adjusted to a max of 56″ top of bag to top of bag.   The bespoke price for the pouch only is $550.  You would, of course,  get a different embroidery design on the flap if I were to make you one.   Priority Mail Shipping runs $20-$25 on outfits and I collect sales tax for VA residents.  Contact me if interested.

If you like this, perhaps you might be interested in some of my other fraktur such as my Birth/Baptismal/Marriage Certificates or paintings.

Pouch 48 - Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch - Full
Pouch 48 – Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch – Full

Pouch 48 - Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch - Flap
Pouch 48 – Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch – Flap

Pouch 48 - Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch - Inside
Pouch 48 – Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch – Inside

Pouch 48 - Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch - Back
Pouch 48 – Embroidered Diary Case/Shot Pouch – Back

On someone’s recommendation,  I decided to add a little banded southern horn to this pouch.     It is a left hand horn that is fairly straight  and was intended from the beginning to be carried on the right side.  Actually all the horns on my personal outfits are left hand horns carried on the right.   I always thought that worked the best.   It was only later that I learned that, historically, left hand horns were generally carried on the left and right hand horns where generally carried on the right.   Of course,  I still carry a left hand horn on the right. 🙂

This horn (#56) is approximately 12″ around the outside curve, 10″ tip to tip (not including the stopper), with a base plug about 2.5″ in diameter.   The base plug is Cherry, the tip is Axis deer antler, and the stopper is Black Walnut.  The base plug is hollowed out about half it’s depth.

As stated above,  the asking price for this outfit with a small patchknife attached to the strap  is $799.   Contact me if you are interested.

Southern Banded Powder Horns

Southern Banded Powder Horns

On this page I have some southern  multi-banded powder horns.   These types of horns are typically found in North Carolina and south.  The single banded horns are covered on the Virginia Applied Tip Powder Horns page.   All these horns have applied tips with most being screw-tips.   If you see something you like,  use the Contact page to get in touch with me, and we can discuss making you a similar horn.

Horn #54 - Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Top
Horn #54 – Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Top

Horn #54 - Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Bottom
Horn #54 – Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Bottom

This medium sized horn (Horn #54) is a traditional right hand carry horn.   It is approximately 14 3/8″ around the outside curve and 12 1/4″ tip to tip not including the Walnut stopper.  The curly Maple base plug is approximately 2 3/4″ in diameter and is hollowed out better than half its length.  The horn weighs a little over 8 oz due to the very dense base plug.  The horn and base plug are stained with ferric nitrate and normally aged.

Horn #54 - Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Outside
Horn #54 – Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Outside

Horn #54 - Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Inside
Horn #54 – Multi-banded southern style powder horn- Inside

Horn #51 - VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #51 – VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Top

Horn #51 - VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Bottom
Horn #51 – VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Bottom

This medium to large sized horn (Horn #51) is a traditional left hand carry inspired by some Early Virginia horns shown in Jay Hopkin’s book Bone Tipped & Banded Horns.  While it is a traditional left hand carry,  it can be carried on the right.  It is 16″ around the outside curve and 12 3/4″ tip to tip not including the stopper.   The Black Walnut base plug is 2.72″ in diameter and hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.   There is also a Black Walnut stopper in the horn screw-tip.  There is no stain on the horn.  It is all finished with Tried & True (linseed oil and beeswax).     This horn is thin and translucent its entire length.  It weighs a little under 8 oz.

Horn #51 - VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #51 – VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Outside

Horn #51 - VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #51 – VA inspired multi-banded powder horn- Inside

Horn #50 - NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #50 – NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Top

Horn #50 - NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Bottom
Horn #50 – NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Bottom

This medium sized horn (Horn #50) is a traditional right hand carry inspired by the horns found in North Carolina.   It is about 14″ around the outside curve and about 11 1/4″ tip to tip.  The walnut base plug  is 2 1/4″ in diameter hollowed out about 3/4 of it’s length.  The applied-tip is Axis deer antler.   The stopper is walnut.

Horn #50 - NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #50 – NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Outside

Horn #50 - NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #50 – NC inspired multi-banded powder horn- Inside

Horn #47 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Top
Horn #47 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Top

Horn #47 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Bottom
Horn #47 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Bottom

This little horn (Horn #47) is a traditional left hand horn, but can be carried either way.    It is about 12″ around the outside curve and 10″ tip to tip.   The walnut base plug is 2.03″ in diameter and hollowed out about 3/4 of it’s length.  The applied-tip is Axis deer antler.  The stopper is walnut.

Horn #47 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Outside
Horn #47 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Outside

Horn #47 - Southern multi-banded powder horn- Inside
Horn #47 – Southern multi-banded powder horn- Inside

Horn #65 - Southern multi-banded powder horn - Top
Horn #65 – Southern multi-banded powder horn – Top

Horn #65 - Southern multi-banded powder horn - Bottom
Horn #65 – Southern multi-banded powder horn – Bottom

 The next horn (Horn #65) is a historically left hand horn carried on the right side so that it wraps around the body.    It is about 14 5/8″ finial to tip, not including the stopper,  around the outside curve.   Tip to tip it is 13″.  The base plug is about 2 5/8″ in diameter.   The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.  The Axis deer antler tip and horn collar are pegged on.   The base plug and stopper are both Black Walnut.

Horn #65 - Southern multi-banded powder horn - Outside
Horn #65 – Southern multi-banded powder horn – Outside

Horn #65 - Southern multi-banded powder horn - Inside
Horn #65 – Southern multi-banded powder horn – Inside

The horn (#27) below is a particularly small one.   It is pretty straight and could easily be, historically, either a right or a left hand carry;  about 11″ around the outside curve staple to stopper.   The base plug is a little less than 2 1/4″ in diameter.   It has a screw-tip with a female thread.  The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.

Horn #27 - A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.
Horn #27 – A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.

Horn #27 - A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.
Horn #27 – A small multi-banded screw-tip powder horn.

Horn #31 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - TopThe following horn (Horn #31) is historically a left hand carry, but is  setup as a right hand carry.   It can be carried either side without a problem.  It is about 13 1/2″ staple to stopper around the outside curve.   The base plug is a little less than 2 1/4″ in diameter.  It has a screw-tip with a female thread.  The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.

Horn #31 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Inside curve
Horn #31 – Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Inside curve

Horn #31 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Outside curve
Horn #31 – Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Outside curve

Horn #32 - Southern multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - TopThe following horn (Horn #32) is historically  a left hand carry, but is marked assuming a right hand carry.  It can be carried on either side.    It is about 15″ button to stopper around the outside curve.   The base plug is a little more than 2 3/8″ in diameter.  It has a screw-tip with a female thread.  The base plug is hollowed out about 1/2 of its length.  There  is  a slight gap between the base ring and the base plug, but the horn is air tight.   This horn is also a little on the heavy side at  7.4 oz.   All that being said,  this is still a very nice looking little horn.

Horn #32 - Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Inside Curve
Horn #32 – Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Inside Curve

Horn #32 - Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn - Outside Curve
Horn #32 – Southern Multi-banded, screw-tip powder horn – Outside Curve

Horn #33 - Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn - Top
Horn #33 – Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn – Top

The following horn (Horn #33) is a big one inspired by some early Virginia horns in Jay Hopkin’s book.  I think it would work well with my early Virginia shot pouch.  It is historically  a right hand carry, but I think it would work better as a left hand carry.    It can be carried on either side.    It is about 17″ button to stopper around the outside curve.   The base plug is a little more than 2 5/8″ in diameter.  It has an applied tip made up from horn and antler.   The base plug is hollowed out about 3/4 of its length.  This horn is actually very light weight for its size.  It weighs 6.8 oz.

Horn #33 - Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn - Inside
Horn #33 – Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn – Outside

Horn #33 - Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn - Outside
Horn #33 – Southern multi-banded, applied -tip powder horn – Inside

All these multi-banded, applied tip horns are priced at $295 plus shipping for a bespoke horn.   Availability of any particular style, size or carry side of powder horn depends on my stock of raw horns.  If you see something you like,  use the Contact page to get in touch with me, and we can discuss making you a similar horn.

Shipping/insurance on a single multi-banded horn is $20 to $25  depending on destination withing the continental US.   VA residents will have to pay an additional 5.3%  to 7% sales tax depending on their locality.

Right or Left Hand Carry?

What is right or left hand carry?  Simply, it is the side of the body on which a horn is intended to be worn.  Historically,  a curve of the tip to the left as viewed from the top is a right hand carry horn and also from the right side of the cow.   A curve of the tip to the right would historically  be a left hand carry horn and from the left side of the cow.   If there is no significant curve of the horn as viewed from the top, then the horn can be easily worn on either side with no conflict.   Most horns have so little curve it really doesn’t matter much and the modern pattern of carry is frequently opposite of the historical pattern.

Carrying a horn on the same side of the body as it came from the cow results in the tip pointing toward the body and the base pointing away from the body.   I also like the base of the horn to point to ward the body, as do many modern wearers, so I usually use the opposite side horn and rotate it about 90 degrees so that both the tip and the base of the horn point into the body.    This makes a horn from the left side of the cow into a powder horn you can carry on the right side of the body.     This is my personal preference, but not generally historically correct.  Historically,  powder horns were usually carried on the same side of the body as they came from on the cow.   If you want to be completely historically correct,  you need to understand that.

Sometimes a horn that is technically a left hand horn might wrap around the body better on the right hand side and vice versa.    So,  in describing a horn,  I will tell you whether a horn is historically a left hand or a right hand.  Then I will tell you on which side the horn was built to be carried,  if it is different.    I will also try to include a photo from the top of the horn so you can see the curve for yourself.     On which side you actually carry a horn, that is up to you.

Applied-tip Powder Horn with Color Fraktur (Horn #44)

I am doing more scrimshawed horns right now and trying some new things.  This is my latest effort featuring a Carolina parakeet and a Northern Cardinal along with some fraktur flowers.   I hope you like it.

This right hand horn is 14″ around the outside curve and 11.5″ tip to tip, not including the stopper. The cherry base plug is 2.29″ in diameter.  The tip is horn and antler. The stopper is walnut.   While this is a traditional right hand horn.  the engraved panels are positioned so that they look right when the horn is worn on either side.

The horn is colored with a little ferric nitrate prior to starting the engraving giving it a light yellow base. The ink is Windsor & Newton drawing ink. I finished up with some Tried and True oil on both the wood and horn followed by a coat of wax.

The bespoke price for a horn like this with a turned base plug and an applied-tip  is $250.   Scrimshaw is $200.   The color is another $100.  I collect the appropriate sales tax when shipped to a Virginia address.

If you like this, perhaps you might be interested in some of my other fraktur such as my Birth/Baptismal/Marriage Certificates or paintings.

Horn #44 - An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of a Carolina parakeet and a Northern Cardinal- Top
Horn #44 – An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of a Carolina parakeet and a Northern Cardinal- Top

Horn #44 - An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of a Carolina parakeet and a Northern Cardinal- Inside
Horn #44 – An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of a Carolina parakeet and a Northern Cardinal- Inside

Horn #44 - An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of a Carolina parakeet and a Northern Cardinal- Bottom
Horn #44 – An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of a Carolina parakeet and a Northern Cardinal- Bottom

Horn #44 - An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of a Carolina parakeet and a Northern Cardinal- Outside
Horn #44 – An applied-tip powder horn with color fraktur engraving of a Carolina parakeet and a Northern Cardinal- Outside

18th Century Style Mens’ Pocketbook

Mens 18th C fraktur tooled pocketbook

Not too long ago, my osteopath told me I needed to take my overstuffed wallet out of my back pocket and ditch it. It was pretty ratty anyway; almost worn through in places. I shopped around for a replacement but just couldn’t find anything just right. I needed to carry my drivers license, registration, proof of insurance, disabled parking card, and medical insurance card as well as some cash, at least one debit card, and a couple grocery discount cards. That was about as much as I could slim down. I had about three times that much stuff in the old wallet, not including the receipts, notes, and other paperwork. It was basically a traveling file cabinet. What I finally decided to do was design a little 18th century style mens’ pocketbook based on the construction of my early VA shot pouch and several original cloth pocketbooks that I had seen.

Fraktur tooling on 18thC men's pocketbookShown here is the result of my efforts. It is still a little overstuffed, but better than what I had. It is made out of goat skin (any new one would probably have to be calf skin), consisting of two sets of pockets flat sewn with a center divider serving as the welt for each set. The pockets fold like the pages of a book with a flap closure.

Fraktur tooling on 18thC men's pocketbook

Fraktur tooling on 18thC men's pocketbook

Fraktur tooling on 18thC men's pocketbookI tooled every exposed surface. The outside is decorated with typically English stamped geometric designs consisting mainly of diagonal lines and stamped stars. The inside panels are tooled with fraktur designs. The stain is vinegar and iron.

If anybody would like one, I will make one with stamped decoration on the exterior panels for $150. If you want original fraktur tooling on the interior panels, that will cost you $220.  I will make a wallet with a single set of pockets for $100.  I will have to add 5.3% sales tax for VA residents. Shipping is $15.

Download the pattern here if you would like to make the pocketbook yourself.